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Pieces Of Color: When YouTube’s oversensitive filters think chess videos are racist, will language have to adapt to Big Tech?

Pieces Of Color: When YouTube’s oversensitive filters think chess videos are racist, will language have to adapt to Big Tech?

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With all its talk of black-on-white war, YouTube’s “hate speech”-filtering AI can’t tell the difference between chess players and violent racists. Perhaps leaving robots in charge of the English language isn’t such a good idea. Croatian chess player Antonio Radic, known to his million subscribers as ‘Agadmator,’ runs the world’s most popular chess channel on YouTube. Last summer he found his account suspended due to its “harmful and dangerous” content. Radic, who was in the middle of a show with Grandmaster Hikaru Nakamura at the time, was puzzled. He received no explanation for the ban, which was reversed on appeal, but speculated that YouTube’s censorship algorithm may have heard him say something like “black goes to B6 instead of C6, white will always be better.” “If that’s the case, I’m sure all [all of] my 1,800 videos will be taken down as it’s black against white to the death in every video,” he told the Sun at the time. Radic was probably correct. Researchers at Carnegie…
Source: Pieces Of Color: When YouTube’s oversensitive filters think chess videos are racist, will language have to adapt to Big Tech?

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