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Author Topic: Khaled Mashal, ( remember my name when i get out )  (Read 4741 times)

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Offline beast

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Khaled Mashal, ( remember my name when i get out )
« on: Feb 13, 2008    02:18:38 PM »
Khaled Mashal, also known as Khaled Mashaal or Khalid Mish'al[1] (Arabic: ???? ????) (b. 1956) is a leader of Hamas. He has been described alternately as the "political leader" of the group and the leader of Hamas's Syrian branch. Khaled Mashaal has claimed responsibility for numerous Palestinian suicide bomb attacks since the Second Intifada, which altogether have claimed a number of Israelis' lives. Khaled Meshaal, also defamed for the violent activities against Israel through his political organization Hamas[clarify]. He openly announces the destruction of the State of Israel as his goal to bring the Palestinian State in exchange. [2]

He currently resides in Damascus

Khaled Mashal was born in the Silwad neighborhood of Ramallah[3], then ruled by Jordan. He married in 1981 and has seven children. His family moved to Kuwait and lived there until 1991 Gulf War. Mashal holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from Kuwait University. While at the University, he was an Islamist Palestinian leader, challenging the dominance of Yasser Arafat's Palestine Liberation Organization on the campus. Mashal participated in the foundation of the Islamic Haqq Bloc, which competed with Fatah on leading the General Union for the Palestinian Students in Kuwait.

When Iraq invaded Kuwait, Mashal moved to Jordan and began his work with Hamas as one of its founders. He has been a member of the Hamas Political Bureau since its inception and became its chairman in 1996.

 Assassination attempt

On September 25, 1997 Mashal was the target of an assassination attempt carried out by the Israeli Mossad under orders from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his security cabinet. Ten Mossad agents carrying Canadian passports entered Jordan, where Mashal was living. They broke into a home where he was sleeping and then applied a deadly poison to his neck.[4] At the time of the assassination attempt Mashal was considered Hamas' Jordanian branch chief.

Jordanian authorities discovered the assassination attempt and arrested two Mossad agents who had engaged in the attempt. Jordan's King Hussein then demanded that Benjamin Netanyahu turn over the poison antidote, and at first Netanyahu refused. As the incident began to grow in political significance, however, American President Bill Clinton intervened and forced Netanyahu to turn over the antidote. [5]

Jordanian authorities later released the Mossad agents in exchange for the release of Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, the founder and spiritual leader of Hamas who was serving a life sentence in an Israeli prison.

In August 1999, possibly in reaction to pressure from the Clinton Administration, Jordanian police issued an arrest warrant for Mashal in advance of a visit to the country by then-Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. [6]

Representing Hamas internationally

In October 2002, Mashal is believed to have met with then-Saudi Crown Prince Abdullah to discuss the Israeli-Palestinian conflict during the World Assembly of Muslim Youth in Riyadh. The outcome of that meeting is unknown. According to Haaretz, supposed Hamas documents discovered by Israeli security forces described the meeting as "excellent". [7] Mashal was named the most senior figure in Hamas after the assassination of Abdel Aziz al-Rantissi.

Mashal was a vocal critic of former Palestinian Authority President, Chairman Yasser Arafat, often refusing to follow directives issued by the PA regarding ceasefires with Israel. Mashal is considered a key force behind this policy, along with the late Sheikh Ahmed Yassin. He attended the funeral of Yasser Arafat, alongside the Saudi Royal family, in Cairo, Egypt, on November 12, 2004. On 9 December 2005, Mashal addressed a crowd in Damascus, Syria on the informal truce with the government of Israel that would end at the end of the year, stating that, "We will not enter a new truce and our people are preparing for a new round of conflict."

Speaking from Damascus, on 29 January 2006, after the shock Hamas victory in the legislative council elections Meshaal stated that Hamas had no plans to disarm. He said that Hamas was ready to "unify the weapons of Palestinian factions, with Palestinian consensus, and form an army like any independent state... an army that protects our people against aggression".

On February 13, 2006, in an interview in Russian newspaper Nezavisimaya Gazeta, Khaled Mashal declared that Hamas would stop armed struggle against Israel if it recognized the 1967 borders, withdrew itself from all Palestinian occupied territories (including the West Bank and East Jerusalem) and recognized Palestinian rights which would include the "right of return". This was the first time that Hamas even talked about an eventual stop to armed struggle. But Mashal continued to refuse to acknowledge the Road map for peace, adopted by the Quartet in June 2003, "since nobody respects it". The Road map projected the establishment of an independent Palestinian state in 2005.[8]

In March 2006, Mashal met with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov for political talks. Russia called on Hamas to transform itself into a purely political organisation, recognise Israel's right to exist, and abide by prior peace accords with Israel.

On July 31, 2006, Mashal warned, in a Reuter interview, Palestinians everywhere against attempts to separate the Lebanese and Palestinian issues. [9] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khaled_Mashal

Offline beast

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Re: Khaled Mashal, ( remember my name when i get out )
« Reply #1 on: Dec 27, 2008    04:55:30 PM »
b

Offline beast

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Re: Khaled Mashal, ( remember my name when i get out )
« Reply #2 on: Feb 18, 2010    01:38:44 AM »
Hamas political chief Khaled Mashaal has called on Palestinian fighters to retaliate for Israel's assassination of the movement's top commander Mahmoud al-Mabhouh in Dubai last month.

"The time for promises and talk of revenge is done. Now is the time for action," Mashaal said in a televised address from Damascus on Wednesday.

Mashaal also denounced what he termed as Israel's terrorist activities against the Palestinians, saying Israel's failure in its December-January 2008 war in the Gaza Strip revealed its "fake existence."

http://www.presstv.ir/detail.aspx?id=118875&sectionid=351020202

Offline beast

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Re: Khaled Mashal, ( remember my name when i get out )
« Reply #3 on: Jan 16, 2011    04:38:10 PM »
b

Offline beast

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Re: Khaled Mashal, ( remember my name when i get out )
« Reply #4 on: Jan 16, 2011    04:41:44 PM »
Mashal = mabus

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Re: Khaled Mashal, ( remember my name when i get out )
« Reply #5 on: Jan 16, 2011    09:03:15 PM »
 :dunno:



Offline beast

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Re: Khaled Mashal, ( remember my name when i get out )
« Reply #6 on: Dec 08, 2012    09:12:21 AM »
b

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Re: Khaled Mashal, ( remember my name when i get out )
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2017    07:51:34 PM »

:cow:

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Re: Khaled Mashal, ( remember my name when i get out )
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2017    07:54:34 PM »
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip: The new political program of Hamas, published Monday, is meant to help the Islamic militant group break out of its international isolation. The manifesto does not formally replace the group’s fiery 1987 founding charter, but adopts more conciliatory language, even if some goals remain unchanged — such as the eventual “liberation” of all of historic Palestine, including what is now Israel.
Here is a look at the program and the group behind it:

What are the main points?
The new program for the first time raises the possibility of establishing a Palestinian state in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and east Jerusalem, territories Israel captured in 1967. In the past, Hamas criticized its main rival, the Fatah party of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, for pursuing a two-state deal with Israel.
Even now, Hamas considers such a state as an interim step, not a way to end the conflict. The new document does not contain an explicit call for Israel’s destruction, but says Hamas “rejects any alternative to the full liberation of Palestine, from the river to the sea.” This refers to the area reaching from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea, which includes the lands that now make up Israel.
While the founding charter was filled with anti-Jewish references, the new document stresses that Hamas bears no enmity toward Jews. The group says its fight is with those who occupy Palestinian lands, regardless of religion.
In its founding charter, Hamas defined itself as a Palestinian branch of the pan-Arab, Egypt-based Muslim Brotherhood. The new program makes no reference to the Brotherhood. Instead, Hamas says it is a national, Islamic liberation movement.
In distancing itself from the Brotherhood, Hamas hopes to improve relations with Egypt which, along with Israel, has been enforcing a border blockade of the Gaza Strip since Hamas took control there a decade ago. Egypt has outlawed the Brotherhood as a terror group.
What and where was it unveiled?
It took Hamas four years of internal debate to draft the five-page document. It was presented Monday in Qatar by Khaled Mashaal, the long-time Hamas leader in exile. An English translation is to be made available on the Hamas website after Mashaal’s announcement.
Separately, Mashaal is to step down as Hamas leader later this month after the group completes secret internal leadership elections. Two possible contenders for the No. 1 spot are Moussa Abu Marzouk, a former Hamas leader, and Ismail Haniyeh, a former top Hamas official in Gaza.

Does it go far enough?
Observers say the changes don’t appear to go far enough to break Hamas’ isolation.
The old charter, which caused much of the world to shun the group, is not being replaced formally by the new document. Hamas officials have expressed concern that such a step could upset the group’s hard-line base, particularly in Gaza. Instead, the two documents will exist side by side, with Hamas referring to the new one as more relevant.
The world wants to see Hamas recognize Israel, renounce violence and abide by interim peace agreements between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization. These were the conditions set by the international community when Hamas swept in the 2006 parliamentary elections.

Will this help end the internal Palestinian split?
The program is being released at a time of escalating tensions between Gaza’s Hamas rulers and Abbas, their main political rival. Abbas has warned he will exert more financial pressure, presumably in the form of cutbacks of wage payments and aid to Gaza, to force Hamas to cede ground there.
The new program is unlikely to change the fundamental rivalry, which erupted a decade ago, after Hamas seized Gaza from forces loyal to Abbas.
On Wednesday, Abbas is to hold his first White House meeting with President Donald Trump. In a sign of business as usual, Hamas has slammed Abbas’ efforts to relaunch US-led talks with Israel on setting up a Palestinian state as an attempt to liquidate the Palestinian cause.


Who is Hamas?
The Sunni Muslim group was formed in December 1987 in Gaza, several days after the outbreak of the first Palestinian uprising against Israel’s occupation. It called for armed resistance and for setting up an Islamic state in all of historic Palestine.
Hamas was involved in two Palestinian uprisings against Israel, along with other factions, using rocks, knife attacks and eventually shootings and bombings against Israeli soldiers and civilians. Over the past decades, it has also built a home-made arsenal of crude rockets that it has fired from Gaza at southern Israel. This has sparked three cross-border wars between Hamas and Israel.
___ :reading:

http://www.arabnews.com/node/1093096/middle-east

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Re: Khaled Mashal, ( remember my name when i get out )
« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2017    08:04:10 PM »