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Author Topic: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous ( Pinned )  (Read 433 times)

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #12 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:27:37 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 13
  •           oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        22 Dec 2008, 09:24 #121
     At todays prices at Costco, I think that's about $1000 worth of food. (groan)
     
     In 1/3 that amount of space I've spent about $250 and thought I was doing good.
     
     I have no idea how long it's going to last us. I got about 6 3 lb tins of coffee and a dozen sweet n low powdered sugar boxes. That was number one, man I gotta have my coffee. I got 2 cases each of each kind of vegetable, tomato sauce, pureee, paste, whole tomatoes, forgot pasta, tuna, oatmeal, cereal, coffee, sugar.
     
     This is not survival stuff. This is how we used to do things in the country. We had a pantry just like the pictures showed, and we had a cellar full of mason jars that Ma would can every summer, all the veggies.
     
     I screwed up. A month ago, I walked past a lady at the flea marketunpacking an old time canner. I'm half-asleep. I got about 15 feet past her, realized what the hell she had, turned around, gone. $25.
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        22 Dec 2008, 09:36 #122
     
    Morgan,Sep 22 2008 wrote: the 55 gal water barrels are getting way expensive
     
     here's a fairly decent alternative
    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/d ... mber=99662 I don't want to say you're wasting you're money, morgan, but those things would crack here after a year or so outdoors, blazing sun. They may last in the shade.
     
     Plastic storage needs to be indoors. I don't know the chemical reaction, but all plastic gets brittle exposed to sun. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  jcd   
    Posts 31
      Learning to chat
    Learning to chat        22 Dec 2008, 23:55 #123
     Thank you for finding a pic OMM of the hobo stove. It was hard to explain how to make one. :clap: Things change when you least expect it.    Quote     Like      Share                  STFUBOT   
    Posts 169
      Could be lost
    Could be lost        23 Dec 2008, 22:51 #124
     
    KnightStar,Dec 22 2008 wrote:
    oldmanmike,Dec 22 2008 wrote:
    KnightStar,Apr 24 2008 wrote: Picked up a 30gal barrel for water and another 30gal barrel for rice today.
    Show me some pix, can you KS?
     
     This has been bugging me. Rice and beans and flour. How do I keep the stuff in an uncontolled environment? Here in NC, the temp ranges from 15 to 105, and it'll get hot and stay hot all july and august and september.
     
     In california, flour would get some kind of bugs in it if I kept it for any length of time, and this was in good Tupperware containers (first wife was a dealer).
    http://www.greif.com/packaging-systems/ ... efault.asp
     
     We don't have the problem with critters as the -30 temps kill them off. http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/produc ... kie_test=1
     
     
     digging a hole to bury them would be a pain
     but the temperature wont vary as much in the ground
     
     
     8 & 15 gal open head drums look manageable
     
     :hi: often lubricated, never duplicated? - Wahya    Quote     Like      Share                  Morgan Byler   
    Posts 11,136
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        24 Dec 2008, 00:30 #125
     Mike:
     
     
     You might wnat to give these places a quick glance every couple of days:
     
     http://curevents.org/forumdisplay.php?f=24
     
     http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/forumdisplay.php?f=11
     
     
     some governmental info:
     
     http://www.fcs.uga.edu/pubs/current/FDNS-E-34-1.html
     
     
     
     good thread here:
     http://goldismoney.info/forums/showthread.php?t=256694
     
      storm's getting worse...
     we'll pass through it soon enough
     
     [size=50%]not by fire, but by ice? [/size]
     
     
      look at the sky five minutes every day and five minutes every night and it will change your life.? ?
     
     
     just sayin'
     
         Quote     Like      Share                  Hoss the SURVIVER   
    Posts 6,266
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        24 Dec 2008, 04:23 #126
     HI ALL
     
     :cow: Thunderation Nooo :unsure: It's it's not
     IT cain't BE
     IT's
     :twitchy: Morgie :twitchy:
     
     :hi: :hi: :hi: hi2 hi2
     
     Hoss dee STUNNED Abby baa baa bloke.
     E G M :hi: :devil: pot :hoss: fo-dang-sho :O hi2 hi2 Hoss dee
     
     Rasool "The Swine Killer" el Wakeel
     
     Islamic swine that is
     
     "Those who make peaceful change impossible, make violent change inevitable.?
     Sheep can be dangerous
     Wolves are dangerous, but nothing is as dangerous
     As a wolf in sheeps clothing
     BLEET BAAAABAAAHH ? SNAP
     
     Oil' be BACK still have imageshack GRANNY GEEFAW    Quote     Like      Share                  Morgan Byler   
    Posts 11,136
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        29 Dec 2008, 16:10 #127
     http://www.thefoodguys.com/topten.htm
     
    wrote:
     
    Top Ten Reasons To Secure Food NOW!!!
     
     
     1. INSURANCE: We insure the things that have value to us, and we wouldn't want to do without! How important is food? Try going without it for just a few days and see if it has as much value to you as your home, car, etc. Maybe you'll find it has even more value?
     
     
     2. WEATHER & EARTH CHANGES: Have you noticed any changes in the weather? Good, I'm glad I'm not the only one. Earthquakes, Floods, Tornados, Hurricanes, all kinds of disasters in ever increasing magnitude. If this isn't a sign of the times, I don't know what is!
     
     
     3. ECONOMIC PROBLEMS: We live in a time where a great majority live beyond their means. It's not surprising since our own government has set such a poor example! I don't know why our country is not bankrupt, do you? We are now over $5.5 trillion dollars in dept and we do not earn near what we need to repay our debts. Now I don't know about your household, but if my household were being run like the government, we would have been out on the street long ago. How long can this continue?
     
     
     4. STORE BOUGHT FOOD: How much food do you think your local grocer has on hand in the event of an emergency? Do you think it would last a day, two, maybe three? That's about it.
     
     
     5. TAINTED FOOD SUPPLY: Remember the "NAFTA" agreement? Now food can be grown in other countries where they use pesticides and other chemicals which have been outlawed in our country. Problem is; because of the NAFTA agreement we can't know where these foods in our stores come from, and whether or not they contain contaminants we don't want to be using. This could become a much more serious problem soon because of the weather problems we've been having in our own country.
     
     
     6. WARS & RUMORS OF WARS: I don't think I need to elaborate.
     
     
     7. JOB SECURITY: Seems as though job loss in this country is running rampant. Every day more and more companies are letting people go without warning. Happend to a friend of mine just the other day. Remember when Corel was still in Utah? No more! Is your job as secure as you think?
     
     
     8. PROPHESY: We have been warned and forwarned since ancient times. When will we listen?
     
     
     9. WISDOM: A wise man once said "It is better to be ten years too early then one day too late". Will we be ready when the time comes? It will come!
     
     
     10. BECAUSE YOU LOVE YOUR FAMILY: It's up to you to be prepared! Don't let your little ones down. They are dependant on your decision to prepare. If you don't they will suffer too. I don't know if I could live with myself if my family went hungry because I failed to listen, or needed that car, boat, etc. more then Food Storage. Could you?
     
     
      storm's getting worse...
     we'll pass through it soon enough
     
     [size=50%]not by fire, but by ice? [/size]
     
     
      look at the sky five minutes every day and five minutes every night and it will change your life.? ?
     
     
     just sayin'
     
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        30 Dec 2008, 13:41 #128
     
     I find this lengthy article a common-sense look into our immediate future. I have seen the same things happen on a smaller scale in past recessions. This is not real bad news, it's just how people do things when governments break their backs.
     
     http://www.oftwominds.com/blogdec08/ris ... 12-08.html
     
     Trends for 2009: The Rise of Informal Work (December 30, 2008)
     
     
     The crushing costs of formal business (State and local government taxes and junk fees rising to pay for unaffordable pensions, etc.) and the implosion of the debt-bubble economy will drive millions into the informal economy of barter, trade and "underground" (cash) work.
     
     As small businesses close their doors and corporations lay off thousands, the unemployed will of necessity shift their focus from finding a new formal job (essentially impossible for most) to fashioning a livelihood in the informal economy.
     
     One example of the informal economy is online businesses--people who make a living selling used items on eBay and other venues. Such businesses can be operated at home and do not require storefronts, rent to commercial landlords, employees, etc., and because they don't require a formal presence then they also fly beneath all the government junk fees imposed on formal businesses.
     
     I have mentioned such informal businesses recently, and the easiest way to grasp the range of possibilities is this: whatever someone did formally, they can do informally.
     
     Chef had a high fixed-cost restaurant which bankrupted him/her? Now he/she prepares meals at home and delivers them to neighbors/old customers for cash. No restaurant, no skyhigh rent, no employees, no payroll taxes, no business licenses, inspection fees, no sales tax, etc. Every dime beyond the cost of food and utilities to prepare the meals stays in Chef's pocket rather than going to the commercial landlords and local government via taxes and fees.
     
     All the customers who couldn't afford $30 meals at the restaurant can afford $10. Everybody wins except commercial landlords (soon to be bankrupt) and local government (soon to be insolvent). How can you bankrupt all the businesses and not go bankrupt yourself?
     
     As long as Chef reports net income on Schedule C, he/she is good to go with Federal and State tax authorities.
     
     Now run the same scenario for mechanics, accountants, therapists, even auto sales--just rent a house with a big yard or an apartment with a big parking lot and away you go; the savvy entrepreneur who moves his/her inventory can stock a few vehicles at a time. No need for a huge lot, high overhead, employees or junk fees. It's cash and carry.
     
     Lumber yard? Come to my backyard lot. Whatever I don't have I can order from a jobber and have delivered to your site.
     
     This is the result of raising the fixed costs of starting and running a small business to such a backbreaking level that few formal businesses can survive.
     
     One example of hundreds/thousands: 20 years ago I paid about $200 for a building permit for a $40,000 starter home. (Not in California, in Hawaii.) Locally in California you pay $350 just to have a staffer "review" your plans--even for a modest bathroom renovation. If they reject your plan for some reason, you still pay the fee. If they approve your project, the permit is much, much more. Oh, and they charge you for the electrical and plumbing permits, too.
     
     Yes, I understand the movement to charge end users of government services; those who use the services should pay. Fair enough. But then what's happening to the 8.5% sales tax we pay, the $10,000 property taxes we pay, and the hundreds or thousands in other fees and income taxes we pay? Why don't those taxes go down if end users are picking up the tabs for "government services"?
     
     Why have state and local government budgets all climbed by 30%-50% in a mere decade?
     
     In a way, it doesn't matter; very few can operate a formal business profitably, and so they close their doors and scrape up a living in the informal cash economy. Local government will see its revenues wither and eventually insolvency will force a radical re-thinking of government revenues, expenses and services.
     
     Until then, watch for the informal economy to grow and the formal economy to wither.
     
     Until recently, the "growth sectors" of the U.S. economy were government and healthcare a.k.a. sick-care. As tax revenues plummet, then all government hiring below the Federal level will reverse into lay-offs. As for healthcare: as formal employment declines, so too will the funds flowing into insurance and healthcare via employers. As employers go belly up, the torrent of money flowing into healthcare will dry up.
     
     Never mind that people want and need care; they can't afford $50,000 for tests and a few visits, or $120,000 for a procedure. Once employers stop paying premiums, then the healthcare industry will find its non-Medicaid/Medicare revenues declining. The future in healthcare is cash and carry, too; few recognize that yet, but more will as the formal economy continues down its high-fixed cost/debt-implosion death-spiral.
     
     Those who survived the collapse of the Soviet Empire have experience with informal economies. Many of you have heard of Dmitri Orlov's Reinventing Collapse: The Soviet Example and American Prospects . We turn now to correspondent A.C.'s commentary on the informal economy in Eastern Europe after the Iron Curtain fell. (A.C. was responding to a previous entry, End of Work, End of Affluence III: The Rise of Informal Businesses, December 10, 2008).
     
     
     I greatly enjoyed your post on the rise of informal businesses. Having grown up during the post-communism collapse in Romania, I say that yes, you are right, this is how the things play out.
     
     One observation: government fees/taxes are a fixed cost to businesses, but the government has fixed costs too. Yes, it can downsize some employees, but usually not too much. Also, people react quite vehemently to forced pay cuts. So the solution is monetizing the debt -- printing money (yes, only the Federal gov can do that but they will likely do it because of Social Security and Medicare). Then just lie in statistics about inflation.
     
     Government employees end up being paid a pittance in terms of purchasing power, and then they also joyfully join the informal economy, under the form of corruption. I often see comparisons between the rate of corruption in the developed world, and the rate in the developing world, but I would like to see how the comparison will look like when government officials cannot afford both housing and food from their salary.
     
     Such corruption does not take the form of an outright request for money, just that processing of papers, etc. will take a really looong time, but somehow gets done immediately if the client shows up by chance with a handbag that is placed quite ostensibly far away from the place where he is sitting. The policeman at a traffic stop finds some banknotes mixed in the insurance papers -- the motorist cannot be accused of anything, who is to blame for mixing some papers? and so on.
     
     Another thing to expect is a much higher petty crime rate. A few years ago I was talking to a policewoman in Palo Alto, who was telling me of how the crime rate has risen in the past recession when unemployment increased by a few percentage point. I heartily laughed, and asked her to imagine how it was in mono-industrial towns in Eastern Europe where unemployment went from 0 to 60% in a few months.
     
     The good thing is that the largest increases in this situation are in nonviolent crime, as most "marginally criminal" people (i.e. who would consider turning to crime when no other options are available) do not have a murderer's mindset. The basic rule is that anything not bolted down gets stolen. Kids were stealing flowers and vegetables from our garden to go sell them in the marketplace. Wheels got stolen from cars quite frequently, and once someone stole a fencepost from our yard.
     
     On a weekend, we planted some small young fruit trees on a piece of land that we had on the outskirts of the city... I hauled water all day uphill while my father was digging the holes. Came back the following weekend to see how the trees were doing... they had been dug out and stolen. Unsurprisingly, the crime rate came down dramatically as the economy improved.
     
     If any of your readers make plans to buy a house a year or two from now when prices will hit bottom, they should make sure that it is not in an area governed by a Home Owner's Association (HOA). Want to have a vegetable garden? Not possible, you are supposed to have an expensive and useless lawn. Want to raise small animals (rabbits, chicken, maybe buy a piglet and fatten it for a few months? Not allowed. Need a fence to diminish the likelyhood of stuff getting stolen and to make sure kids don't play in the street? Not allowed. Want to run a home-based business? Nope. Need/want to have tenants for an extra buck? Verboten. Want to build/remodel a house to be as energy-efficient as possible? Don't even think about it.
     
     Right now all the above things are probably possible in the countryside, but most people live in large cities because that's where the jobs are. It's easy to say "just move to the country", but then how will you set aside money for children's college and for a proper retirement?
     
     By the way of retirement :-) In order to avoid a very quick monetization of debt, when it comes to Social Security, the government has one more option --- nationalize individual retirement accounts (done in Argentina a month or so ago). Your IRA/401(k) savings are replaced with a special government bond with a generous inflation-indexed interest rate, which starts being payable at the date of retirement. The actual money in your account is used to fund the current government obligations. By the time you retired, real inflation will have eaten away most of the bond payments' purchasing power.
     
     America does have, however, one thing going strong for it, that Eastern European countries did not: for most Americans, immigrating elsewhere is not an option. This means that the brightest and the most enterprising folk will stay in the country and try to improve things, as opposed to just leaving. That makes for high unemployment in the short run, but for a quicker recovery in the long run.
     
     As for the cost/value of used goods: you may also consider that in very hard times the sale value of a stolen or even garage sale item is not related to the price at which a new good would sell, but to whatever the thief/seller can unload it for, even if that is a total pittance. Pair of good skis for 30$? Hey, that's food for a couple of days, so what if a practically similar pair can be found in the store for $200 (which would itself be a 60% discount from the previous year).
     
     Why would the price in the store be $200 and not come down to $30, even if that means pitifully low sale volumes and most stores going out of business? There is an answer to that:
     
     While the price of commodities and new manufactured goods will decline, they cannot really stay for a long time under the production cost, because then production facilities (factories/mines/oil wells) get shut down (unless they are subsidized by some government). When the price you get for products is under the cost of raw material inputs, you shut down the production facility (even if you may keep paying part of workers to stay idle, if you are lucky to get some government subsidies).
     
     So a lot of production facilities may go bankrupt, and supply can diminish drastically until it meets demand, but the price would still not fall below the price of raw materials + transport + packaging. Existing stocks of products may be unloaded at a loss, but production facilities cannot function permanently this way. On the other hand, wages can fall to almost zero, with wages of service sector workers falling with them too. So this is why in Eastern Europe in the early 1990s you saw simultaneously:
     
     (1) very low wages and high unemployment;
     
     (2) very low service sector prices, i.e. a few cents/dollars for a hairdo / nail job / dentist visit, as the service sector people cannot go into hibernation to stop eating and diminish production;
     
     (3) prices for new/imported manufactured goods that were very cheap compared to what they would sell in the West (global market segmentation), but EXPENSIVE in terms of local incomes (price cannot fall below raw material costs on a permanent basis), and with VERY low sale volumes. Yes, 90% of the (state-owned) retailers and manufacturers went bankrupt and eventually disappeared.
     
     (4) very low prices, and high sales volumes (read: large flea markets) for anything second-hand.
     
     Another thing to note is that if wages fall dramatically, then it becomes profitable to establish production facilities in the US again. In November 2007 we took a vacation in Florida, and my first thought at the sight of the massive wall of dark, empty condo towers north of Miami was: "Five years from now, a smart entrepreneur will buy a few of them for a pittance, build a factory next door and a light rail line from the apartments to the factory (roads were never adjusted to the projected population density), and offer people a factory job + housing package, which the homeless crowds will gladly take. The catch is that the salary would be very small of course. Heck, probably the state will buy the condos or confiscate them from the banks for not paying taxes, and offer them at zero rent to entrepreneurs, just to generate jobs".
     
     Thank you, A.C. for a multi-faceted commentary based on experience. We turn now to correspondent Freeacre for a report that shows it's not just small businesses being driven under by absurd government junk fees:
     
     I so needed to build an additional bathroom onto my home in Tahoe when I lived there. I could have created a small, but nice, little apartment that I could have rented out to help keep a roof over my head. I had a housemate who was a carpenter, who would have worked for rent. . . But Nooooo. In order to build a bathroom, it would have required $5,000 upfront just for the building permit!! Extortion!
     
     Now we are in Oregon and fighting the county tooth and nail regarding these ridiculous $30-40,000 individual sewage treatment monstrosities that they want to require us to install. They will require a separate phone line, a $400 per year maintenance fee, and a license as a water treatment plant to put in - for a nitrogen reduction situation that is only projected by a flawed computer model to be a problem in 120 years! And, they don't even treat for real problems like chemical and pharmaceutical pollution.
     
     The latest insult is that the money supposedly set aside to help poorer people put in these things is $65,000 light now because they gave it to a staff person to answer our e-mails. They blame it on us getting involved in the public process!

     
     It's not just the small business owners, it's the citizenry as a whole that these parasites are sucking dry. We are in the process of organizing a local Grange that will have an on-site Farmers Market and Trading Post. We will trade and barter food, goods and services when the economic grid goes down, and they can kiss our collective ass. I can hardly wait for the county to have to lay off those SOBs. If they continue to insist that we put in a nitrogen reduction system, we'll just purchase a $1,000 composting toilet. They we can tell them to "eat dung and die." And, we can use the compost for the garden.
     
     The government, the banks, and the investment class are all in the process of killing the geese that lay the golden eggs. Nothing will change until we get them off our backs.
     
     For fun, Charles, I have sent the county your article just to mess with their heads. Ha!
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        11 Jan 2009, 22:26 #129
     http://www.backyardchickens.com/
     
     Putting it here for reference - I know I'll be back and reading it.
     
     BTW. I was in 4-H in upstate NY. Cornell Universtiy used to publish bulletins on how to plan and grow a garden. It was dialed into the area. I would kill, just kill to have one of those bulletins - they put them out evey year in the early 50s. It told you when, how, and how deep, and how far apart. Everything you needed to know on a couple of sheets.
     
     http://www.gardening.cornell.edu/homega ... eb771.html
     
     4-H clubs in Chemung County died when the blacks sued the county because the county was giving a certain amount - we're talking 1000, 2000 a year here, to help out the 4-H clubs, buying chickens pigs and cows, providing space at the county fair, that's where the money went. Anyhow, the blacks sued because they said it was racist, all the white folks were getting the money. They won. So the county quit giving the money and 4-H died. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  Wahya   
    Posts 18,014
      Hard to believe
    Hard to believe        22 Jan 2009, 23:27 #130
     If any of ya'll want US military surplus ammo cans, better get them now.
     
     They're not selling them anymore to the public. Get them while ye can.
     
     They're starting to get scarce.
     

Offline Archiver

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #13 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:28:46 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 14
  •           oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        26 Jan 2009, 14:47 #131
     
    oldmanmike,Jan 11 2009 wrote:
    http://www.backyardchickens.com/
     
     Putting it here for reference - I know I'll be back and reading it.
     
     BTW. I was in 4-H in upstate NY. Cornell Universtiy used to publish bulletins on how to plan and grow a garden. It was dialed into the area. I would kill, just kill to have one of those bulletins - they put them out evey year in the early 50s. It told you when, how, and how deep, and how far apart. Everything you needed to know on a couple of sheets.
     
     http://www.gardening.cornell.edu/homega ... eb771.html I found what I was looking for, sort of, today at the Chesnee fleamarket.
     
     What I was thinking of were USDA bulletins, published during the 1930s, reprinted until the 1960s.
     
     Here's what I found. This is a dynamite (literally) little feed company brochure printed in 1937 in Lancaster, PA - this is the heart of the Amish country.
     
     When I say dynamite, "The best way to remove tree stumps is to use a stick of dynamite, readily available at your local hardware store. This loosens the soil surrounding the stump, making replanting of a tree fairly easy."
     
     Inside, there are two pages of a selected list of numbered USDA bulletins. For example #826 - Butter, Making of. By selected, I'm going to assume that these are the bulletins that are related to the family farm.
     
     I scanned these two pages in, but I can't post them here because they are 800KB each, after averaging and bumping up the contrast. Nice and clear. PM me with your email and I'll send them to you.
     
     These bulletins contain, I'd guess, 150 years of accumulated common-sense knowledge of how to do things yourself, how to raise your own food. These bulletins were printed up by agricultural agents when knowledge was measured by dirt under your fingernails instead of paper in your resume.
     
     I did a quick google and they're on EBAY, here and there. I didn't want to know that. You're going to find them at flea markets, auctions (box and contents), and estate sales. Start looking. The numbers will tell you what to look for. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                   oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        26 Jan 2009, 14:53 #132
     Here's an example of handy-dandy info:
     
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        27 Jan 2009, 01:47 #133
     USDA Farm Bulletins 1937
     
     1283 Alfalfa, how to grow
     1360 Apple growing east of Miss. River
     1646 Asparagus
     1464 Barley
     1350 Barns, beef cattle
     1415 Beef on the farm
     1399 Blackberry growing
     1167 Breeding, animal, essentials
     1062 Buckwheat
     0876 Butter, making on farm
     1762 Canning of fruits, vegetables, and meats
     1471 Canning of fruits and vegetables
     1374 Care of food in the home
     1572 Cellars, making dry
     0849 Capons and caponizing
     1734 Cheese, making on the farm
     1451 Cheese, cottage
     0776 Cherries, east of Rocky Mts.
     1506 Chickens, American breeds
     1541 Chickens, feeding
     1649 Chimneys and fireplaces
     1279 Concrete, plain, for farm use
     1480 Concrete, small, construction
     1634 Corn, sweet, for cannery
     1148 Cowpeas
     1475 Crop rotation
     0924 Crop yields, how to increase
     1620 Cucumbers for pickles
     1563 Cucumber growing
     1398 Currants and gooseberries
     1342 Dairy-barn construction
     1393 Dairy-barn ventilation
     1412 Dairy bull management
     1443 Dairy cattle breeds
     1626 Dairy cows, feeding
     1470 Dairy cows, management
     1610 Dairy farming for beginners
     1214 Dairy houses, farm
     1723 Dairy stock, feeding and management
     1403 Dewberry growing
     0984 Drying of fruits and vegetables
     0697 Duck raising
     1738 Farmhouse plans
     0900 Fruit butters, homemade
     1001 Fruit growing for home use
     1242 Fruit and vegetable gardens
     1673 Gardens, farm
     0767 Goose raising
     0471 Grape propagation
     1290 Grain handling
     1542 Grain, cleaning
     1727 Hens, selecting for eggs
     1487 Hog houses, practical
     1082 Home supplies furnished by farm
     0653 Honey, its use in the home
     1039 Honey, comb, production
     0155 Ice well for dairy farm
     1538 Incubation and brooding of chickens
     1630 Irrigation of alfalfa
     1518 Irrigation of orchards
     1683 Irrigation channels, measuring water
     1556 Irrigation of small grain
     0864 Irrigation, practical information
     1513, Kitchens, convenient
     1573 Legume hays for milk production
     1609 Lettuce growing
     0921 Liming soils
     1660 Logs and poles in farm construction
     0336 Milk cooling on farm
     0976 Milk and cream cooling
     1705 Milk for the family
     1359 Milk, uses in the home
     1675 Milk utensils, care
     1315 Milking machines, cleaning
     1587 Mushroom culture
     1501 Nut tree propagation
     1640 Oats, fall-sown
     1659 Oats, Northeastern States
     1583 Oats, red, spring-sown
     0354 Onion culture
     0434 Onion seeds and sets
     0232 Okra
     0917 Peach growing
     1255 Peas for canning
     1132 Planning the farmstead
     1426 Plumbing, farm
     1679 Pop corn
     1190 Potatoes, growing an acre
     1442 Potatoes, seed
     1438 Potatoes, why run out
     1554 Poultry houses
     1508 Poultry, keeping in backyard
     1524 Poultry, raising
     0181 Pruning
     1500 Rammed earth walls
     0887 Rasberry culture
     1703 Reservoirs for farm use
     1390 Seeds for home and market garden
     0948 Seed tester, rag doll
     0428 Seed testing
     1088 Selecting a farm
     1227 Sewerage of farm homes
     0578 Silage, making and feeding
     0855 Silos, homemade
     0825 Silos, pit
     0879 Storage, home, of vegetables
     -----------------------------------------
     
     Number preceded by a 0 - 0 for alignment purposes only. Not there in the original list.
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  vikingwoman   
    Posts 72
      Could be lost
    Could be lost        27 Jan 2009, 20:06 #134
     Get the Storey little books - I'll try to find the link. They are all over the place here in VT.
     
     http://www.storey.com/
     
     They publish country guides from horsekeeping to bee keeping to butter making and dried foods and make it fairly simple enough for a city dweller to deal with.
     
     Check that out!
     
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        28 Jan 2009, 00:01 #135
     I did vike, thanks. Appreciate it. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        29 Jan 2009, 00:56 #136
     These books come recommended:
     
     http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_b?url ... st&x=0&y=0
     
     I ordered the Root Cellar one - $8 - just for ideas - cheap enough. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        06 Feb 2009, 21:08 #137
     Don't kill this thread. I have alot of posting to do here, just haven't found time. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        06 Feb 2009, 21:18 #138
     
    oldmanmike,Feb 6 2009 wrote: Don't kill this thread. I have alot of posting to do here, just haven't found time.
    :thumb: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        07 Feb 2009, 18:24 #139
     I've tried making readable reduced .jpg files out of the USDA lists without success. So PM me your email address and I'll email you a zip file will all three .jpg files.
     ====================================================
     
     Since then:
     
     Here's a good website and book from Arrow.
     
     http://www.sufficientself.com/
     
     http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_b?url ... st&x=0&y=0
     
     I bought the book on "root cellaring" - outstanding, good diagrams, all kinds of ways to store food underground. Written by a person in a cold climate.
     
     ----
     
     
     Michigan State has an index to online .pdfs of newer versions of USDA bulletins.
     Here's canning:
     
     http://agnic.msu.edu/hgpubs/modus/morefile/hg8_47.pdf
     
     growing vegetables in the home garden - 1972
     
     
     http://agnic.msu.edu/hgpubs/modus/morefile/hg202_72.pdf
     
     Freezing fruits and vegetables - 1982
     http://agnic.msu.edu/hgpubs/modus/morefile/hg10_82.pdf
     
     Making jellies and jams - 1965
     
     http://agnic.msu.edu/hgpubs/modus/morefile/hg56_65.pdf
     
     Making pickles and relishes - 1992
     
     http://agnic.msu.edu/hgpubs/modus/morefile/hg92_64.pdf
     
     Rabbit fricasees -1953
     
     http://agnic.msu.edu/hgpubs/modus/morefile/hg35_53.pdf
     
     This is for grins - actually, this farmhouse is similar to what I grew up in. It's a 1954 publication - Remodeling your farmhouse. Check the Maytag in the laundry area, ladies. They add, "In south, however, they prefer to do their laundry on the back porch." Thaaaat's right, and they still do.
     
     http://agnic.msu.edu/hgpubs/modus/morefile/hg42_54.pdf
     
     That's it for Michigan State.
     
     ====================================
     
     1994 canning guide - color. Great illustrations.
     
     http://www.uga.edu/nchfp//publications/ ... ide_01.pdf
     
     1990s stuff on the utah website:
     
     http://www.uga.edu/nchfp//publications/ ... _usda.html
     
     1930s how to do a pit barbecue for a hundred people
     How to cut up a steer
     
     http://weblog.ceicher.com/archives/The% ... rbecue.pdf
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        07 Feb 2009, 19:39 #140
     How one lady did a 3 hen chicken coop - but the $1 a pound for corn works out to $3 a dozen eggs - a little on the high side, I'd say.
     ===================================================
     
     Dimensions of the coop are 6' x 3' x 4'h. The coop is wired all around with small grid wire and has an entrance door. The interior box, which is off the ground is approx 3' x 2.5', with 2 nesting boxes jutting out the one end with an easy open lid. That is the coop proper. It sits on laid patio stone base and has wood rails at bottom and a locking door. The fence is 3 ft high around the enclosure. The enclosure measure roughly 12' x 25' and includes a pine tree which they like to shelter under, and five locust trees in a rough circle. I've clipped their primary flight feathers on one side to keep them from flying. It works-only one has escaped but that one is a crafty chicken!
     
     Redtails are medium sized hawks. You've seen them I'm sure. Google images or Wikipedia-I'll bet you'll recognize them.They like to hunt the pigeons that roost on the tall
     gables of the house down the street. The fishing line strung between the five locust trees
     where their coop sits (and where they spend most of their time) about 6 ft high,and is enough to keep them out. I have seen one come in on a dive and pull up sharply when they see the fishing line. I have the line strung down to the top of the 3 ft. fence on 3 sides. I did this because I did not want this monstrous totally enclosed structure in my yard, and you can't see the fishing line until you get right up to it. I live on a corner lot, so it keeps the view from the house and street nice, plus provides a sense of freedom for the girls ( I think!).
     
     I feed them cracked corn, scratch, sunflower kernels (protein & fat), crushed eggshell (calcium), raisins, strawberries, chopped greens. Sometimes I put in protein crumbles.I find it a good way to use the fruit and greens that are soft but still good. I cut the bad parts out and give the rest to the girls. They love it! Especially raisins. I buy the corn and scratch from the feed store, who charges 1.19/lb. They go through about 20 lbs in about 4 weeks. I need to locate another place that sells the feed cheaper. My feeding regimen is working because I am getting consistent eggs with nice thick shells, and the birds are healthy.
     
     I use a ground concrete bird feeder that I made myself and put an electric bird bath de-icer in it to keep it from freezing. It works. I clean it out every couple of days. Suprisingly, there is very little poop in the water. They don't like to step in it -they like to stand on the rim and drink.
     
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #14 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:29:56 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 15
  •           oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        07 Feb 2009, 19:47 #141
     Cornell Univversity - Ithaca NY has the entire series of the USDA bulletins squirreled away in a box. It's a shame. The Cornell publications on agriculture, in the middle of dairy farming country, are gawdawful. Don't waste your time.
     
     http://rmc.library.cornell.edu/ead/html ... 01820.html
     
     
     
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        07 Feb 2009, 20:03 #142
     http://www.soilandhealth.org/
     
     This website here, compliments of Croze on Crowsnest, is a treasure of out of print books on agriculture. It would take years to digest them all. Some of the titles are extremely interesting.
     
     The Albrecht book up front, I started reading the .pdf and before you know it , it was 4AM it was that interesting.
     
     Anyway, you can go overboard on this stuff, like anything else. The thing you have to remember about agriculture and horticulture is, YOU ARE THE EXPERT ON YOUR OWN PROPERTY. Everything written is to prefaced in your mind with, "Generally speaking." "It depends." Everyone's land is different, very different. Your neighbor grows 2 foot ears of corn, while yours are 4". You have softball size tomatoes and his are ping-pong ball size.
     
     I think the key is soil PH. Somewhere in my horticulture books I have a chart that tells you where, between 5.0 and 7.0 different vegetables grow best. PH has to be 5.0 and 7.0, above and below, not much will grow. Below is swamp land, above is desert. Think of PH like the key to a food-filled pantry. No key, you starve. PH not in range, plant starves. You can water and fertilize all you want, it won't work.
     
     A good PH meter in the 90s cost $30. To test your soil, make a slurry in a pie pan. Calibrate the meter on distilled water (7.0) and stick the probe in the slurry and wait.
     
     The PH scale runs from 0 to 14, 0=acid=sweet, 14=alakalai = sour. 7 = neutral = water. You lime soil to raise the ph, sulphur to lower it. Here in NC red clay, everyone limes the shit out it their property. I haven't yet - it makes the grass grow too fast and thick and I have to cut it. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        11 Feb 2009, 07:04 #143
     Here's the $250 rototiller I got Monday down in Shelby off Craigslist. I've been looking since last fall. These rear tine tillers in runnable shape are just not around. Front tines beat you to death. There's a big one on EBAY right now in Kentucky, last I looked 6 bids $200. Good one.
     
     Now, the newer bigger 13 horse 16" wide 6" rear tillers for $650 are a better machine. This is a 8 horse 12". This thing here is a pain in the ass. The belts are slipping, the reverse disk is worn out, the gas tank holds about a quart. But it starts, runs good, and it's getting the job done.
     
     This is the first pass, about 3 times through a 60' by 30' plot. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  MagicHands   
    Posts 1,102
      Chat-aholic
    Chat-aholic        12 Feb 2009, 20:58 #144
     :clap: Lookin' Good Mike.
     Looks like you have a nice spot there!
     Is it your first garden in that area?
     
     Michele Living it up at the Hotel California!
     
     *Overdosing on the Red Pill*    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        14 Feb 2009, 07:49 #145
     Thanks Michele, yes it's my first garden in this area. Everyone here grows corn, cauliflower, tomatoes, watermelon, and pumkins. So I'll try everything else. This is an experiment. I have no idea how much I can grow. The size I'm copying from my buddy Dale in upstate NY.
     
     Actually I picked the area where the grass was the thickest, where it's most level - the whole property slopes downhill from the house. Sharon wouldn't let me use the yard......
     
     Hindsight says I could have gone down to the golf course and gotten the sod cutter. Less work but wasteful on the soil.
     
     The engine on the tiller has a starter motor. It works. Took it apart and shined it up and bench-tested it. See it? the brown round thing just forward of the belts cover. Hmmmmm - I'm getting sidetracked here but it would be nice if I could find one of those handle mounted batteries that you plug into the wall to recharge. I also need a throttle cable which I'm going to get right now at the flea market.
     
     Now I'm looking for horse manure. I'm a month late. They spread it last month and plowed this month. I think I need a pick-up load (about a yard). "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        14 Feb 2009, 07:58 #146
     Our ground is still frozen down 3' and covered with snow. :dejected: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        14 Feb 2009, 17:38 #147
     Up until recently most people including family and friends thought I was going over the deep end with my preparations. My wife was onboard real early and my one daughter sees only the savings in buying things in bulk or on sale. My other daughter thinks I've gone looney but her husband is leaning to my side. My son is oblivious but thinks it's a lot of fun learning weapons and outdoorsy stuff.
     
     Now in the past few months a lot of people, even strangers, are calling or looking me up at work to ask my advice on weapons or food storage or just general financial advice. It was a big help that I warned them of the downturn last year and the fall 'correction' in the markets. I established credibility with that. Now that I am letting people know that it is most probably going to get much, much worse, they are starting to pay attention. I have noticed people are starting to wake up 'en masse' in our area.
     
     But then there are those that are still going to have to learn the hard way. :disbelief: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        14 Feb 2009, 22:16 #148
     The only two people I have credibility with is my wife and my pastor. The old folks sortof agree with me, but NC people being the way they are, they'll never tell you that, they knew it all along. But that's ok. For most of these people, life can't get any harder than what it is. This is a very poor county.
     
     It's very frustrating. Stepson won't listen. Daughter won't listen, she;s trying to renegotiate a condo loan is Sarasota from 150 to 50 I told her to walk. No she wants to "own something", it'll get better next year, won't it? as a statement of fact, not asking a question. I gave her th e websites and all the arguing info.
     
     I'm calling a bottom in some areas in Florida. Like Lehigh Acres - 45K for a 3-2. That'll work. That wasn't a short sale - that was selling price. Sarasota average 3-2 150K. They have about 50K to go to reach 1998 prices, start of the boom.
     ==============
     
     Back to gardening. KS. Spread your manure in the fall and let the snow soak it in. They manure here in late January damnit while I was doing shelves. I missed by about two weeks and no one has any horseshit.
     
     ==============
     
     Remember how you doubled your speed on that dryer motor for a saw?
     
     I didn't know this formula.
     
     [size=75%]Drive pulley diameter / driven pulley diameter * input RPM = OUTPUT RPM[/size] "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        17 Feb 2009, 08:04 #149
     I bought a cheap PH meter. The Ph of my soil is around 7 neutral. I thought to myself, "Why do people lime if the PH is high?, doesn't lime raise PH? That's what I learned in my Florida horticultural classes." They lime like crazy around here, 1 ton/acre on red clay.
     
     It turns out other people have asked the same question.
     
     This .pdf from OSU raises more questions than it answers, but it demonstrates the need for lime in northern soils. Florida is a different animal. I gotta forget what I learned in Florida. Plants up north need calcium more than they need a good PH.
     
     https://kb.osu.edu/dspace/bitstream/181 ... 04_227.pdf
     
     Down to Lowe's for 20 bags of lime. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  Hoss the SURVIVER   
    Posts 6,266
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        19 Feb 2009, 17:24 #150
     HI ALL
     WELL they finished
     
     A cheap spray can o car LACQUER n there ya go
     
     Lacqueared R & R’s
     
     
     
     So now what can i get up to
     CYLOPS SADIE is coming??
     
     Hoss dee ROTTER FELLA abby baa baa bloke
     E G M :hi: :worship: :pot: :devil: :thumb: :hi: :hi: :hi: :hi:
     
      Hoss dee
     
     Rasool "The Swine Killer" el Wakeel
     
     Islamic swine that is
     
     "Those who make peaceful change impossible, make violent change inevitable.?
     Sheep can be dangerous
     Wolves are dangerous, but nothing is as dangerous
     As a wolf in sheeps clothing
     BLEET BAAAABAAAHH ? SNAP
     
     Oil' be BACK still have imageshack GRANNY GEEFAW

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #15 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:31:03 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 16
  •           beast   
    Posts 23,967
      Looney
    Looney        19 Feb 2009, 20:18 #151
     YoNews    Quote     Like      Share                   oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        20 Feb 2009, 21:59 #152
     From an old farmer:
     
     
     You can use chicken manure as fertilizer if you spread it in the fall, then it gets all winter to sit and get the steam taken out of it.
     
     You can't use it direct, and you can't use it and rototill it in because you'll burn the seed, burn the plant roots. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        20 Feb 2009, 22:09 #153
     Nice sheathes, there, Hoss.
     
     The brand new Troybilts down at Lowe's are half the size of mine for $770. Holy smokes!!! I got a bargain.
     
     I put a throttle control on the right handle, added a brace to the throttle/spring assembly using easily drillable and bendable chain link fence ends (about 6ftx1") real cheap.
     
     I mounted a solenoid ($13) using the gas tank straps that bolt into the cylinder head, fabbed a cable from the solenoid to the starter using #6 multi-standed heavily insulated copper wire left over from the outside box project.
     
     Even lawnmower batteries cost. $25-$60. They used to be 19.99 - 25.99 in the nineties.
     
     I know what I want to do, but I haven't figured out how I'm going to do the starter button up on the handlebar. I used aforementioned bracket material up top to fab a battery bracket, it will sit on top of the belt cover.
     
     ==
     
     Cow manured Monday, spread it yesterday. Set off a soil sample for PH and minerals.
     
     I spent $35 on seeds at Lowe's. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  Morgan Byler   
    Posts 11,136
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        20 Feb 2009, 22:20 #154
     
     
     lots of info and stuff you can print out
     
     http://readymoms.org/
     
     check it out storm's getting worse...
     we'll pass through it soon enough
     
     [size=50%]not by fire, but by ice? [/size]
     
     
      look at the sky five minutes every day and five minutes every night and it will change your life.? ?
     
     
     just sayin'
     
         Quote     Like      Share                  Herb   
    Posts 26,216
      Creepy as Hell
    Creepy as Hell        21 Feb 2009, 14:46 #155
     http://www.lehmans.com/index.jsp    Quote     Like      Share                  Hoss the SURVIVER   
    Posts 6,266
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        21 Feb 2009, 17:47 #156
     HI ALL
     
     What about an electronic starter switch from a Motorcycle Mike that should be close to the handle bar diameter
     
     Just a thought.
     
     Hoss dee Abby baa baa bloke.
     E G M Hoss dee
     
     Rasool "The Swine Killer" el Wakeel
     
     Islamic swine that is
     
     "Those who make peaceful change impossible, make violent change inevitable.?
     Sheep can be dangerous
     Wolves are dangerous, but nothing is as dangerous
     As a wolf in sheeps clothing
     BLEET BAAAABAAAHH ? SNAP
     
     Oil' be BACK still have imageshack GRANNY GEEFAW    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        21 Feb 2009, 21:35 #157
     Thanks, Hoss!!!! I never thought of that. I leaning towards a push button momentary 12 volt switch that Radio Shack sells, but then I would have to mount it. I never thought of going to a motorcycle shop. All I got to do is run 12V to the switch, which sends it to the solenoid. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        22 Feb 2009, 18:00 #158
     Here's what's happening. I didn't get enough manure.
     
     Everywhere they say put it down at the rate of 1lb per sq ft. That works out to a shovelful. I got about half that. Fertilizer is 10-10-10, a bag will cover 1800 sq ft.
     
     Here in the Carolinas, there are two growing seasons for veggies, spring and fall. The summer is too hot. You manure in the fall, after you've emptied your garden, and in the spring, about a month before planting. 1st planting is late February, cabbage, onions and rutabagas should be in the ground now, as seedlings. You're supposed to be growing seedlings during the winter on the windowsills, I find out.
     
     Because the weather gets too hot here in the summer, root cellars are out of the question. By too hot, eg, last July was 100+ most of the month, and June, August, and part of September was 90+. Ground temps run 65-70.
     
     In thinking about it, you realize why corn and collards and blackeyed peas and okra are staples here. The stuff grows like hell, especially okra, along with cotton and peanuts.
     
     That's why meat and potatoes and onions are a staple up north. They keep. Nothing keeps down here. Either you eat it, or freeze it, or can it, or throw it out.
     
     Beets won't grow in clay. Gooseberries and currants are verboten, state law. They harbor a fungus that attacks white pine, which used to provide men with a livelihood here.
     
     
     
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        03 Mar 2009, 00:50 #159
     I ain't listening to any more locals on when to plant stuff. From now on, it's April, and if it's not soon enough for cool weather veggies, then I'll plant them again Oct 1.
     
     Garden's under 4" of snow, and we had 5" of rain prior to the snow. It'll take two weeks to dry out.
     
     Those idiots lost a ton of money. I only lost $12 worth of cabbage and broccoli. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        07 Mar 2009, 13:08 #160
     I talked to Larry-next-door's mother (85) born 1924, this morning, as she was sitting in Larry's garage shelling pecans, perfect halves, every one. She described life in Rutherford County, NC, 1930-1935.
     
     The only things they bought at the store were sugar, salt, and coffee. Very little else. No one had money.
     
     They raised cotten to take to the mill in exchange for cloth, which they made their own clothes. They took corn to the mill in exchange for corn meal.
     
     Ten in the family, they had 3 milk cows, and a flow-through "spring box" that they set in the creek to keep the milk cool. She still has her butter churn.
     
     They didn't get electricity until 1934, under Roosevelt's rural electrification program. Even after that, they got ice from the ice-man for the ice box for the milk, butter, and cheese, in exchange for the same.
     
     Their father spread wheat in an upstairs room, on top of which they spread apples and pears. Stayed fresh all winter, she said, we always had fresh fruit. I never heard of this method.
     
     They kept potatoes and onions and canned goods in a hand-dug cellar with a gabled roof right to the ground, with steps leading down. There was a compartment for the different veggies, and some shelves to keep the the jars.
     Nothing froze. (Thinking I can dig out a place under my double-wide. Garage is unsuitable for potato and onion storage.)
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #16 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:32:27 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 17
  •           KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        07 Mar 2009, 14:29 #161
     
    oldmanmike,Mar 7 2009 wrote: Their father spread wheat in an upstairs room, on top of which they spread apples and pears. Stayed fresh all winter, she said, we always had fresh fruit. I never heard of this method.
     
     They kept potatoes and onions and canned goods in a hand-dug cellar with a gabled roof right to the ground, with steps leading down. There was a compartment for the different veggies, and some shelves to keep the the jars.
     Nothing froze. (Thinking I can dig out a place under my double-wide. Garage is unsuitable for potato and onion storage.)
    I never heard of that either. Very interesting.
     
     
     Around these here parts a cold cellar has to be below the frost line (about three feet down)or everything will freeze, but most people insulated a room in the basement with an adjustable vent though a boarded up window. My dad and I made one in the house when I was knee-high to a grasshopper.
     
     At least we don't have to worry about a freezer 6 months of the year. :lol: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  Hoss the SURVIVER   
    Posts 6,266
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        07 Mar 2009, 18:14 #162
     HI ALL
     
     My dad and I made one in the house when I was knee-high to a grasshopper.
     If U was that short/ how tall was he
     Knee high to Tom thumb?
     
     Yup cool cellars like that where pretty common in the early part of the 1900's. Look at it this way K S it could double as a?
     
     Nuclear shelter, better strengthen the door though just in case SADIE comes to visit
     
     Hoss dee bright abby baa baa bloke
     E G M Hoss dee
     
     Rasool "The Swine Killer" el Wakeel
     
     Islamic swine that is
     
     "Those who make peaceful change impossible, make violent change inevitable.?
     Sheep can be dangerous
     Wolves are dangerous, but nothing is as dangerous
     As a wolf in sheeps clothing
     BLEET BAAAABAAAHH ? SNAP
     
     Oil' be BACK still have imageshack GRANNY GEEFAW    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        07 Mar 2009, 21:23 #163
     http://www.myfoxatlanta.com/dpp/news/dp ... nia2239009
     
     Check what the old lady says at the very end of the video.
     
     Larry's mother looked right at me and said, "You don't know what poor is." I should have gone home and gotten my family album and a shot of the farm. We were poorer than poor, for the '50s. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  Morgan Byler   
    Posts 11,136
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        08 Mar 2009, 16:06 #164
     
     how to make all kinds of knots:
     
     http://www.animatedknots.com/knotlist.p ... dknots.com
     
     check it out storm's getting worse...
     we'll pass through it soon enough
     
     [size=50%]not by fire, but by ice? [/size]
     
     
      look at the sky five minutes every day and five minutes every night and it will change your life.? ?
     
     
     just sayin'
     
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        08 Mar 2009, 22:50 #165
     This is one guy's account of how to survive in Argentina. Written with 7 years experience in back of him, he's (at the time) 26, married. Quite sobering. 4 parts.
     
     http://www.silverbearcafe.com/private/10.08/tshtf1.html "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        09 Mar 2009, 03:20 #166
     Hoop house construction. Very Interesting. I saw a similar henhouse. Actually, when I was growing up, they called them Quonset huts.
     
     http://www.noble.org/Ag/Horticulture/Ho ... /Index.htm "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        15 Mar 2009, 23:22 #167
     This is a pretty good website for how to raise chickens in the suburbs if your neighbors don't complain too much.
     
     In the gallery, there are 140 pictures of various home brew "chicken tractors" that is, portable (as in a wheel barrow) chicken coops. I never heard of such a thing but I think this is slick. IF ONLY 3/4s of these would have taken a pix of inside the access boxes. The FAQ is interesting, also. The lady says she can't imagine this being a source of food if "things get too bad". She says you have to give them laying mash which costs. Makes sense, even though we let our run outdoors, we had to feed them laying mash, also (jin the 50s) - but it was cheap, not $5 for 25 lbs like she says.
     
     Most of what this lady has to say is common sense.
     
     Chicken scratch is $15 for $50 here in rural NC
     
     http://home.centurytel.net/thecitychicken/index.html "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  Morgan Byler   
    Posts 11,136
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        17 Mar 2009, 16:13 #168
     fyi
     
     
     Food Saver Cannister Sealer Sale at Cabelas storm's getting worse...
     we'll pass through it soon enough
     
     [size=50%]not by fire, but by ice? [/size]
     
     
      look at the sky five minutes every day and five minutes every night and it will change your life.? ?
     
     
     just sayin'
     
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        18 Mar 2009, 23:11 #169
     Canning again.
     
     I said earlier I wanted to flash freeze (blanche, dump in a bag, toss in the fride); I got outvoted.
     
     Sharon wants to can.
     
     So I was checking out the price of a dozen pint jars or a dozen quart jars, with screw top and lid at the hardware store. - $9. I thought that was pretty cheap. I check with my main man Buck (we fleamarket and junkshop alot). He says 9 is too much, don't pay more than 4/doz. But Buck, you have to buy lids and keepers. That another 3 bucks, he says. Inwardly I groan - what about the gas and time traipsing around Chesnee? But I didn't say anything. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        20 Mar 2009, 21:50 #170
     Here we go - all the knots you need to know, right from the 1954 Boy Scouts Manual.
     
     
     
     
     
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #17 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:33:22 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 18
  •           oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        20 Mar 2009, 21:52 #171
     deleted "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                   Sadie   
    Posts 62,392
      Creepy as Hell
    Creepy as Hell        20 Mar 2009, 23:11 #172
     do you know that for some reason, I have that book!
     
     it was my brothers but I'm not sure how I ended up with it.
     
     I don't think it could be the same year but the cover is the same.
     
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        21 Mar 2009, 01:08 #173
     If there's a Schwinn bike on the rear cover, and a Royal Tire ad on the inside, it's the same year 1954. Mine is copywrited 1947 - they may have started issuing the overall format then.
     
     It's an amazing book. This, in a nutshell, is why America has gone to hell. Look at what was expected of us in the way of behavior and responsibility when we were young. Scout uniform in church on Sunday. That's right, they expected you to attend church every Sunday with your parents. "Scout's honor". The code. A scout is trustworth, loyal, honest, respectful...
     
     The only thing kids know now is how to turn the TV or play videos. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        21 Mar 2009, 01:23 #174
     Here's an A-frame simple chicken tractor on craigslist - detailed photos.
     
     http://asheville.craigslist.org/grd/1075836299.html "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        29 Mar 2009, 11:29 #175
     In between the two lengthy rainstorms, I got the potatoes in. One 5lb bag of seed potatoes quartered is good for a 25 ft. row. We'll see how many potates I get this fall.
     Seed corn is an unbelieveable $9/lb. Last year it was $7. I bought a pound, enough for 4 rows. I have yet to count seeds and convert to inches to see how long the rows will be.
     
     =====
     
     One week of constant rain and drizzle has saturated everything. But what I've planted in the 1st week of March (cabbage, cauliflower, onions, brussel sprouts, broccoli) is doing well. The wife said there's more green out there than there was before.
     
     =====
     
     In Florida, while it is raining, the grass does not grow. Here in NC red clay, it does. Interesting. In Florida, the saturated soil (95% sand) prevents the roots from getting oxygen. Therefore, the soil here does not saturate in the rain like it does in Florida.
     
     =====
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  STFUBOT   
    Posts 169
      Could be lost
    Could be lost        29 Mar 2009, 19:02 #176
     maybe this goes here;
     
     use dry ice to store grain long term
     
     dry ice in bottom of barrel/drum, fill with grain
     
     add lid but do not seal lid, leave loose for air to escape
     
     after six to 24 hours seal lid
     
     heavier carbon dioxide displaces oxygen in the barrel/drum
     
     reportedly will keep grain for 20 years.....as dry ice leaves no moisture
     
     
     
     
     
     :hi: often lubricated, never duplicated? - Wahya    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        03 Apr 2009, 10:16 #177
     Corn.
     
     The websites and the back of the packages say plant a kernel in a row 4" apart. I bought my seed a month ago, waiting......so I was talking to an old Broad River bottom land corn farmer (acreage) yesterday over at Larry's, and I asked him how much a pound of seed would plant. He said, using one kernel, about yay apart (he holds his hands 18" apart) a pound'll plant you four rows from here to the road (100 yards - I stepped it off). Then he says, FREEZE what you don't plant, be good for next year.
     I'm going to do it like he says. He mixes silver and yellow so that they cross-pollinate, he likes his "speckled", "good eatin'".
     
     Corn seed jumped $2/a pound at the feed store. He bought his seed at $11/lb. I bought mine at $9. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        09 Apr 2009, 11:17 #178
     Tomatoes:
     
     This website, even though it's Purdue, is a mother link to links for most regions, most varieties (except Rutgers), for producing tomatoes for the market or the home. I got 50 Rutgers for $15. It's what they grow here. Good common sense website.
     
     http://www.hort.purdue.edu/rhodcv/hort4 ... /tomat.htm
     
     The West Virgina extension service recommended tomatoes being planted on FIVE FOOT CENTERS, for crying out loud. That's about 5 acres for 5 plants. Get out of town!
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        10 Apr 2009, 14:54 #179
     It's been bugging me - how much to plant. Seek and ye shall find. Today at a 2nd hand shop next to the hardware store, where I needed some one inch washers, I got this for 3 bucks.
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        10 Apr 2009, 14:58 #180
     2nd page "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #18 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:35:14 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 19
  •           oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        10 Apr 2009, 15:00 #181
     How much
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                   oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        10 Apr 2009, 15:01 #182
     How they did it
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        10 Apr 2009, 15:03 #183
     I think I need to put the whole book in here, what do you guys think? It summarizes what I've been talking about, those USDA booklets, how we did things back in the 40s and 50s. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  Sadie   
    Posts 62,392
      Creepy as Hell
    Creepy as Hell        10 Apr 2009, 17:38 #184
     here is something that might be useful.
     
     But, I'm not so sure just a regular fire or cookstove wouldn't be better.
     
     http://edition.cnn.com/2009/TECH/04/09/ ... index.html
     
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        10 Apr 2009, 18:06 #185
     I'm depressed.
     
     Soil PH.
     
     If your soil PH isn't between 5.5 to 6.5, you're going to have problems depending on the plants and vegetables you're using, right from the get-go.
     
     It's like this. Let's say you're starving to death and the food pantry door is locked. If you can't find the key to the pantry door, you're going to starve to death.
     
     It's same thing with a plant. You can water and fertilize all you want, but if the PH isn't in the window, you're wasting your time.
     
     I screwed up. I always "knew" something was wrong here. No flowers I'd plant would grow. Wrong kind of weeds. Grass wouldn't grow back in a bare spot. Dogwood I put kinda sickly. The neighbors said lime it. Ya gotta lime it. I never did, because I knew lime raised PH and I didn't know what the PH was, good soil PH meters are VERY expensive, I just didn't know my way around.
     
     When I lived in Florida, people said I had a green thumb. But that was 15 years of going to night school, watching, asking questions, seeing what worked and what didn't under what conditions.
     
     I assumed that if the neighbors can grow stuff I can too. Just do it. Wrong.
     
     I sent off a soil sample to the extension service in Raliegh in Feb. I should have paid for private. I got it back today. SEVEN POINT TWO. Awayyyyy too high. Nobody around here ever heard of such a thing. (What's PH? Gotta lahm it, Mahk. Stock answer. That's all they know.) The local garden supply store doesn't sell aluminum sulphate.
     
     The best answer is to plow under about 20 tons/acre of cow manure and wait a year or so for it to work.
     
     So anyway here's a Clemson .pdf that discusses how to raise and lower PH and how many lbs. of lime or sulphur or aluminum sulphate /10 sq ft. to use.
     
     http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/p ... ic1650.pdf
     
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        11 Apr 2009, 17:44 #186
     
    Sadie,Apr 10 2009 wrote: here is something that might be useful.
     
     But, I'm not so sure just a regular fire or cookstove wouldn't be better.
     
    http://edition.cnn.com/2009/TECH/04/09/ ... index.html That will only work when the sun is shining and is outside.
     
     
     They do work pretty well tho. :) "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        11 Apr 2009, 17:45 #187
     
    oldmanmike,Apr 10 2009 wrote: I think I need to put the whole book in here, what do you guys think? It summarizes what I've been talking about, those USDA booklets, how we did things back in the 40s and 50s.
    How many pages is it? :unsure: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        13 Apr 2009, 12:54 #188
     
    KnightStar,Apr 11 2009 wrote:
    oldmanmike,Apr 10 2009 wrote: I think I need to put the whole book in here, what do you guys think? It summarizes what I've been talking about, those USDA booklets, how we did things back in the 40s and 50s.
    How many pages is it?
    :unsure: Forget it.
     
     Wait 'til I get the time to .pdf it with Sadie's link. See how that works. It's really a good booklet. It shows how it all works together, the chickens the pigs the cows the garden the hayfields and cornfields. It also shows that unless you're a diehard, determined to get along the way folks used to, you're just whistling Dixie. You have to be already doing it to do it.
     
     These armchair survivalists who think if something happens, oh, I'll just get a place in the country, plant a garden, and I'll get along fine. That ain't gonna happen. You need good soil, a means of tilling it, a means of water, seed, a means of fertilizing it cheap (vegetables remove nutrients), and a means of storage once it's grown. All that nowadows takes a ton of money. Everything costs.
     
     This booklet shows you pictures of how they did things during the war BY HAND or BY HORSES. There wasn't any diesel or gas to run the tractors. They rusted in the sheds. Petroleum was rationed. If you didn't have any pull or bucks to get the ration coupons on the black market, you did it like 1889.
     
     There's another thing - organic. "I'm not going to use any chemicals." Yeah right. If the only thing between you and hunger is liquid Seven to kill some pest that's going to wipe you out, you're going to use liquid Seven.
     
     Even us in the 50s we weren't even close to being self-sufficent. We had 120 acres, 40 woods, 20 pasture, 40 fields, big barn. We had a couple of cows, couple of pigs, about 50 chickens, some geese running around, and 100x100 garden.
     
     It wasn't enough. I mean it all helped, but there's no way 40 acres was going to support a family. It was alot of work. Ma still spent $30-$40 a week at the grocery on two big boxes of groceries.
     
     Pa worked 40 hours a week in the foundry, me and my brothers did most of the work around this place in the country in Chemung, in upstate New York.
     
     There's 300 million people in this country. Think about how America currently feeds the world, and what would happen if we didn't have the means to do so. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        27 Apr 2009, 09:18 #189
     SUCCESS!!!!
     
     Most of my stuff popped while in Florida. I experimented with manure/no manure and I can safely say that if you manure your planting area first, it will be better for you. I used the cheap stuff ($1.50/bag at Lowe's). The dairy farmers here got wise - they're charging $25/pickup load for cow manure they used to give away. EVERYONE is putting in a garden.
     
     For example.
     
     40 foot row of potatoes. April 1. I dragged a hoe forming a 4-6" trench, manured the row, ran out of manure the last 10 ft, placed the cut-up seed potatoes eyes up, one every foot. April 26th - I have potato plants showing except for the last 10 ft.
     
     Crows:
     
     String a WHITE string around the perimeter of your garden, about knee high. Criss cross diagonally, so that when you're done you have 4 isosocles triangles.
     
     The crows will walk around it, and leave. They will think it's a trap.
    "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  beast   
    Posts 23,967
      Looney
    Looney        19 May 2009, 01:07 #190
     How to Plan an Ecological Water-Harvesting System for Your Home
     By Toby Hemenway, Chelsea Green Publishing
     Posted on May 18, 2009, Printed on May 18, 2009
     http://www.alternet.org/story/140085/
     
     The following is an excerpt from Gaia's Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture, Second Edition by Toby Hemenway. It has been adapted for the Web.
     
     Every home has a handy rainwater collection system built right into it: the roof. Rainwater splashes on rooftops, drips into the gutters, sluices through downspouts, and then goes … away, usually into a storm-drain system. Even in the desert, rainwater usually is treated as a problem to be disposed of, not as the valuable resource it is. I've watched countless acre-feet of rainwater collect on summerbaked parking lots, swirl uselessly down drains, and gurgle toward the ocean, while nearby sprinklers hiss and stutter the last remaining bits of some fossil aquifer onto lawns. Those lawns could easily be watered by that parking-lot catchment system or by rooftop-collected water.
     
     How much water can a roof catch? A lot. The average 2,000-square-foot, two-story house has over 1,000 square feet of roof (most houses plus the garage have far more). If that house is in a region receiving forty inches of rain a year (the average for much of the United States), the roof will collect 25,000 gallons of water each year. That's enough to keep a 1,000-squarefoot garden watered for 250 days of drought.
     
     A 25,000-gallon tank is a little large for the typical backyard, but it's also rarely necessary. In the eastern half of North America, summer rain usually falls every two or three weeks. To drastically reduce municipal or well water use in that part of the country, we only need to store enough to tide us over between rains, or a couple of weeks' worth of irrigation water. How much water is that? A typical garden that covers 1,000 square feet needs roughly 100 gallons per day to thrive (and that's generous water use). Two weeks' worth of water would thus be 1,400 gallons, which would fit into a circular pond two feet deep and ten feet across, or a tank five feet high and six feet on each side. A pond or tank that size will easily fit into a typical yard.
     
     We can further shrink the amount of water storage needed, of course, by using water-conserving techniques such as mulches, lots of organic matter, and drip irrigation. I know people who get most of their irrigation water from just four fifty-five-gallon drums, one at each downspout. These drums are easy to camouflage with plantings and paint.
     
     Rainless periods can last longer than two or three weeks anywhere on the continent, so for those who truly want to be water-independent, water storage needs to be larger. If you have the space and resources to build a large water tank or pond, then go for it. My point here is simply to show that it's easy to harvest rain, which greatly reduces our dependence on uncertain and energy-consuming water sources.
     
     Compared to Easterners, those in the American West are in tougher shape because rainfall in the West is rarely sufficient for gardening. Outside help is essential. Total rainfall on the Great Plains is less than twenty-five inches, not enough for most garden plants. On much of the West Coast a summer stretch of ninety rainless days is common. Water storage in the West simply needs to be larger. The 5,000-gallon rainwater tank in my Oakland yard, sunk in the ground and camouflaged with a deck and grape arbor, took us through only six weeks of drought.
     
     Tanks are utilitarian, but ponds add habitat and visual pleasure to the list of water storage's possible roles. On a hot day the sight of sparkling water edged by lush greenery seems to drop the temperature by ten degrees. Ponds are also cheaper than tanks and can hold far more water if needed.
     
     The secret of storing water in a pond is depth since the smaller surface area needed by a deeper pond to store a given volume means less evaporation. A twelve-by-twelve-foot garden pond that's four feet deep instead of the usual two can store over 4,000 gallons of water. Obviously, if you're pulling water from the pond for irrigation, you will have to develop some strategies for protecting plants and fish when the water level drops toward the bottom. One possibility is to have one pond strictly for irrigation and a second, smaller one for finny and leafy inhabitants.
     
     A typical garden pond is lined with flexible plastic and edged with flat rocks. In nature, you'll never see a pond that looks like this -- a tidy opening in the ground rimmed with an even border of flagstones -- and that design creates problems. Birds, small mammals, and many insects can't drink from a pond with such a sheer rock edge. Earle Barnhart, a landscape designer on Cape Cod, has evolved a more natural pond edge, replacing some or all of this abrupt rock drop-off with a gently sloping beach, as shown in Figure 5-5 (below). Small animals can sip at the water's edge in this design. One warning: Larger animals, such as dogs and children, may also be attracted to this backyard beach, with possibly messy results.
     
     To see how a pond can be both a landscape focal point and a practical water source for the garden, let's look at what forestry consultant and permaculturist Tom Ward did in his Ashland, Oregon, yard. Tom built a 3,000-gallon pond on the uphill side of his vegetable garden. “After we dug the hole for the pond,” Tom told me, “we added three coats of a product called plastic cement, troweled onto bird netting, for reinforcement.” He could have used a rubber or plastic liner but chose a less-expensive but more labor-intensive method since he's got plenty of friends to help him build. The pond is fed by downspouts from the house next door and from a shed in the lot behind Tom's. Both neighbors responded readily to his request for their runoff water.
     
     The pond was new when I visited, but Tom intended to stock it with edible fish and a variety of useful and attractive plants. However, the pond's benefits extend beyond its boundaries. A swale runs alongside the pond. Overflow dribbles out of the pond, down a rock waterfall, and into the swale. The water is captured by the level swale and sinks into the soil. Tom's vegetable garden is just downhill from the swale, and the expanding lens of subterranean wetness from the swale moves down the slope toward the crops like a slow underground tide. The pond and swale thus form a subsurface irrigation system for the nearby garden. Once again, placing the pieces in the right relationship lets nature do the work and substantially cuts Tom's reliance on municipal water.
     
     At the outlet end of the swale, about twenty feet from the waterfall inlet, Tom planted blueberry bushes. Any water that flows the entire length of the swale and spills out the far end is captured by these shrubs.
     
     This is a fine example of ecological design. The pond harvests rainfall from his neighbors' roofs, the swale collects any surplus from the pond, and the garden and blueberries benefit from moisture taken in by the swale. Tom has integrated a pond into his garden that is attractive and practical and that connects once-separate elements -- even from beyond his own property -- into a healthy, smoothly functioning whole.
     
     © 2009 Chelsea Green Publishing All rights reserved.
     View this story online at: http://www.alternet.org/story/140085/ YoNews

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #19 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:36:17 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 20
  •           oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        23 May 2009, 20:19 #191
     The radishes are ready. I read on a website I can plant radishes around here every two weeks up to the middle of May....and every two weeks starting in Sept.
     Well, doing that I can run out of room in a hurry.
     
     The cauliflower is ready, also.
     
     We had some dynamite cabbage at the church's poor man supper tonight. Core out the cabbage, pack it with Nature's Seasoning and butter, in place of the core. 1" core.
     
     Wrap it in tinfoil, place it on the barbie on low for 1 hour, or until soft and tender. This tastes better than boiled cabbage. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                   oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        23 May 2009, 20:20 #192
     I can't find flashlight bulbs anywhere. PR 2s, 4s, 6s.?????????? "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        09 Jun 2009, 19:49 #193
     There isn't anything like a meal out of the garden. It was gooooooood. The beets that I grew are the best, absolutely the best I ever tasted. I don't like beets but I like these. Praise the Lord for the rain, the land, the food and the Troybilt. You can't do nothing without the Lord.
     
     Last night we had lettuce, radishes, small pepper and an onion on the salad. Beets and beet greens, peas, and a couple of broccoli spears, along with a cheap Delmonico steak and some store-bought quartered red potatoes.
     
     Pix below, 2 weeks later with 90 degrees and rain every day = everything is doubled in size. That corn is my shoulder high. Corn is now head high. Saturday I "layed it back", as they say around here, went down each row, piled the dirt high around each stalk, cut off the sucker stalks, and fertilized with 10-10-10 (recommended 17-17-17, but that's what I had, it is what it is.)
     
     EVERYTHING was planted last week in March, first week in April. Corn, potatoes, peas, beans, radishes, carrots, lettuce, beets, tomatoes (Rutger), peppers, onions,cauliflower, and brussel sprouts (I don't know what's happening with them).
     
     I'm getting respect in this neighborhood. I got more tomatoes than anyone, before anyone. I put out 50 plants, all made it. After all the shitting around, I ended up using a post hole digger to dig a 6" hole, lined each hole with cheap (1.27/40 lb) cow manure, set the plant so that dirt was up to the lowest leaves of each seedling, cover the top with manure and a layer of mulch. 50 plants cost $15, $2.50 for manure, $2.50 for mulch. We're going to can every bit of it, because we use tomatoes in everything. Soups, sauces, casseroles.
     ----
     
     The negatives:
     
     The peas are Lowe's, six peas per pod. Small. At that rate, I'd have to plant a couple of hundred foot rows to have anything to can. Out of that 50 foot row you see there, will be enough for four or five meals. So next year by God I'm getting Burpee seeds, 10 per pod, and right now they're out.
     
     The lettuce I could have planted a couple of weeks or so later. It's edible after 30 days.
     
     The radishes - I don't know. If I planted any earlier, it's too cold. If I planted any later, it's too hot (+85) and they go to seed. They don't have any bite to them if they ripen in the hot weather, or they grow skinny.
     
     The same goes for broccoli. Out of 10 plants, 7 died from cold (under 35) 3 were edible and we were gone for two of them by the time we got back (3 days) they had gone to seed. You have to stay right on top of broccoli, day to day. Cauliflower is ready to go after 35 days.
     
     The cauliflower, cabbage and brussel sprouts and peppers you can set and forget.
     
     The month of May sees temp extremes from 35 to 95 here in the foothills of NC.
     So it's tough. Also, the 7.75 inches of rain we had in May set a record for Rutherford County. Also, it's 5 degrees cooler this side of the slope towards the valley between here and Columbus.
     
     The method I used to plant tomatoes this year will be used to plant all seedlings next year. Next year the corn will be down below, I will have less tomatoes, more beets and peas and beans. Strawberries grow like hell, I'm going to have a patch somewhere. The only trouble is each plants costs 3.29 at Lowe's, and they sell out. All the nurseries use the Flea Market as an overage outlet, so there's no point in paying Lowe's the big bucks.
     
     All in all, it turned out well. Again, Praise the Lord!
     
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        09 Jun 2009, 19:53 #194
     :clap:
     
     
     I should have tomatoes next week.
     
     
     We've been under the threat of frost here for the past week, but it will be in the 80's this weekend. "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        09 Jun 2009, 19:57 #195
     
    KnightStar,Jun 9 2009 wrote:
    :clap:
     
     
     I should have tomatoes next week.
     
     
     We've been under the threat of frost here for the past week, but it will be in the 80's this weekend. So soon?
     
     
     What's your secret? I won't get one for two more weeks. What's there is hard green, one has a streak of yellow. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        09 Jun 2009, 20:00 #196
     
    oldmanmike,Jun 9 2009 wrote:
    KnightStar,Jun 9 2009 wrote:
    :clap:
     
     
     I should have tomatoes next week.
     
     
     We've been under the threat of frost here for the past week, but it will be in the 80's this weekend. So soon?
     
     
     What's your secret? I won't get one for two more weeks. What's there is hard green, one has a streak of yellow. I picked up some "Early Girls" from the nursery that were already flowering about 2 weeks ago.
     
     I have 4 different tomatoe plants and a bell pepper plant in containers on my deck. No garden this year. :cry: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        09 Jun 2009, 20:14 #197
     You cheater! :lol:
     
     A good garden is alot of work, especially the first time you tilll ground that hasn't been tilled before.
     
     That little dam on the right slows up the water so that it kinda filters across the center of the garden instead of washing it out.
     
     It's a funny thing. Because of that little dam, the water now pools for a bit on the north side of the fruitless plum next to the garden. Therefore, the north side of the tree has one-foot longer foilage on the crown than the south side.....before, it was balanced. Whenever you want to see how a tree is doing, always check the crown. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        09 Jun 2009, 20:52 #198
     My backyard is undergoing major landscaping, so no room for a garden.
     
     
     I wanted tomatoes tho, but we're having a very late spring so I bought some already half growed. :hehe: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  Radioman   
    Posts 2,583
      Top Cat
    Top Cat        12 Jun 2009, 20:08 #199
     Anybody got any experience with deer repellent (no, can't use the 12 G!).
     
     Been here 8 years and this is the first year that the deer are all over the place!
     
     Someone told me to grate the soap, "Irish Spring" around the place, says deer can't stand it. Sounds like one of those rural legends (vs. Urban Legends!), but I'm going to try it this weekend. It's cheap enough, so that even if it doesn't work, I'm not out a lot and it can't do much harm, except maybe to make the lower 40 look like a bubble bath in a downpour :lol: When all else fails: Amateur Radio    Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        12 Jun 2009, 20:18 #200
     
    Radioman,Jun 12 2009 wrote: Anybody got any experience with deer repellent (no, can't use the 12 G!).
     
     Been here 8 years and this is the first year that the deer are all over the place!
     
     Someone told me to grate the soap, "Irish Spring" around the place, says deer can't stand it. Sounds like one of those rural legends (vs. Urban Legends!), but I'm going to try it this weekend. It's cheap enough, so that even if it doesn't work, I'm not out a lot and it can't do much harm, except maybe to make the lower 40 look like a bubble bath in a downpour
    :lol: I would try scattering mothballs around the perimeter.
     
     
     
     It worked with my skunk problem! :lol:
     
     
     
     :ks:

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #20 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:38:05 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 21
  •           oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        21 Jun 2009, 21:55 #201
     http://www.seedsave.org/issi/issi_904.html
     
     1 pepper has enough seeds for 100 more plants. Several pepper had brown, mature seeds, most are small and white. I saved them, then wondered how "they" did it.
     ===========
     
     Radioman, what they do here is string the perimeter of whereever you're trying to keep deer out of, and tie tinfoil, or some plastic flag material to the string. Anything bright and shiny that waves in the wind. They can jump anything, so don't waste your money on a fence.
     
     It occurred to me that a string of blinking Christmas lights might work. Light scares them. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        08 Jul 2009, 09:27 #202
     We went to Chillicothe to see my brother and came back with 8 dozen Ball mason jars. Not that we'll ever use that many, but he didn't want them, and I know people that can use them (besides us).
     
     Canning jars are selling for two or three bucks a dozen at the fleamarkets and garage sales. The lids and screwtops are a buck and half a dozen at Walmart and the hardware stores.
     
     We had our first corn on the cob last week. - Words cannot describe how good corn in from the stalk to the boiling pot of water to your table. Incredible. I have false teeth and store corn I have to scrape off the cob to eat.
     
     It takes 3 pounds of boiled and skinned tomatoes to fill a one quart jar. To recap, I put in 50 plants. I should have used iron posts and steel stockyard wire to tie them up, like Dave Banning down the road. I would have increased my yield. But I didn't, no matter. We've canned 7 quarts of tomatoes (that's alotta tomatoes, have 16 pounds or so on the table ripening. I can't vine ripen the tomatoes, the worms will get them no matter how much Sevin you sprinkle. Forget it, dusting tomatoes for worms is a waste of money.
     
     I have never seen tomatoes grow like they do here. Never. We had mangy, scraggly old plants in New York, except for one year when it rained alot.
     
     Anyway, I've given away alot, I've thrown out alot, we've eaten alot (balogna and cheese and tomato and lettuce is my favorite fast food) and the bulk of them is yet to come.
     
     I don't recommend what I planted, Rutgers tomatoes. The size varies wildly, from marbles to softballs. The blossoms are sensitive to temps under 50 degrees, I planted last week in April first week in May. The result is what they call "cat-facing" on the bottom, and mishapen - bulgy. But when you get a good Rutgers, there ain't no better eating. The best ones are coming in now.
     
     All 15 cabbages are harvested - we kept three and gave ten to the soup kitchen, them people like their cole slaw. So like I said, this was an experiment, to see what grows here and what doesn't. I wish you could stagger them, but you can't. If they were in the ground any longer, the bugs would get them.
     
     What does:
     Collards.
     Corn.
     Tomatoes.
     Cabbage.
     Beets. (early) Too hot now.
     Lettuce.(early)
     Beans.
     Peas.
     Strawberries.
     Brussl Sprouts. But they take up soooooo much room, for just an itty bitty veggie (but I love them).
     
     In retrospect, all my root crops have not done well, except for the early beets, and they were small to medium.
     
     Broccoli - very sensitive to heat and cold.
     Cauliflower - The real farmers who do it for money here plant very early, in Feb early March, then pink- plastic sheet everthing.
     
     Onions grow very slowly here, but the white onions are almost garlicy in taste and wow, you break off the top and the smell is all over the house. I love onion tops in my salads.
     
     I figured out we use about a quart of tomatoes every two weeks. So that's about 26 quarts/year. So that's about 90 lbs of tomatoes. I have 17 quarts canned now.
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        13 Aug 2009, 17:39 #203
     
    oldmanmike,Jun 21 2009 wrote:
     Radioman, what they do here is string the perimeter of whereever you're trying to keep deer out of, and tie tinfoil, or some plastic flag material to the string. Anything bright and shiny that waves in the wind. They can jump anything, so don't waste your money on a fence.
     
     It occurred to me that a string of blinking Christmas lights might work. Light scares them.
    Radio, I gave you the wrong answer.
     
     Larry next door had broached me earlier in the year about doing a corn plot 5 miles south of here. He described the layout and I said, no thanks.
     
     It's a good thing. He didn't get the corn planted until June, until the ground dried out, and the deer wiped him out. Bubba had even put in a stand, in hopes of shooting one so that the rest would be scared. Didn't happen, but I know them pot-smoking people down there (not Larry), not enough intestinal fortitude to stick with something like that.
     
     But anyway, string and wind blown stuff works with crows, not with deer. We have deer up here but never more than onsey, twosey. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  beast   
    Posts 23,967
      Looney
    Looney        22 Aug 2009, 19:56 #204
     how to make a fire with steel wool and a battery :cow:
     
      YoNews    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
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      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        22 Aug 2009, 21:01 #205
     Great stuff, beast - I just got that video today in an email "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  Sadie   
    Posts 62,392
      Creepy as Hell
    Creepy as Hell        17 Oct 2009, 23:34 #206
     Everyone is getting in on the act.
     
     http://foodinsurance.com/
     
         Quote     Like      Share                  Hoss the SURVIVER   
    Posts 6,266
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        19 Oct 2009, 03:14 #207
     HI ALL
     
     This simple idea was dreamed up by a 19 year old Girl.
     
     Simple really, that is why i went for the image study it ?
     
     
     The concept can be any shape, that is convenient
     
     Hoss dee abby baa baa bratsta bloke
     E G M :hi: :thumb: :bolt:
     
      Hoss dee
     
     Rasool "The Swine Killer" el Wakeel
     
     Islamic swine that is
     
     "Those who make peaceful change impossible, make violent change inevitable.?
     Sheep can be dangerous
     Wolves are dangerous, but nothing is as dangerous
     As a wolf in sheeps clothing
     BLEET BAAAABAAAHH ? SNAP
     
     Oil' be BACK still have imageshack GRANNY GEEFAW    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        20 Oct 2009, 00:27 #208
     I think the two week supply of the food insurance link is a good deal. Our stash consists of tuna, cereal, veggies, and coffee, mainly. I have 2 different kinds of cookstoves. I'd say we have at least a year or two supply. I call it the pantry. Use a case, replace a case. 8 months on the coffee. I use a 3lb can a month. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  beast   
    Posts 23,967
      Looney
    Looney        19 Nov 2009, 01:08 #209
     Cheddar and Chiles Bread
     
     Makes 1 9×5-inch loaf
     
     Equipment:
     1 9×5-inch loaf pan
     
     3½ cups (17.5 ounces) unbleached white bread flour, plus more as needed
     1 Tablespoon granulated sugar
     1½ teaspoons salt
     1 teaspoon instant, fast-rising, or bread machine yeast
     2 Tablespoons corn oil, canola oil, or other flavorless vegetable oil, plus extra for coating dough top and loaf pan
     1-2/3 cups ice water, plus more if needed
     8 ounces (3 lightly packed cups) coarsely grated very sharp cheddar cheese, preferably white cheddar
     ½ cup very well-drained and patted dry chopped canned green chiles
     
     1. In a large bowl, thoroughly stir together the flour, sugar, salt, and yeast. In another bowl or measuring cup, whisk the oil into the water. Thoroughly stir the mixture into the bowl with the flour, scraping down the sides until the ingredients are thoroughly blended. If the mixture is too dry to incorporate all the flour, a bit at a time, stir in just enough more ice water to blend the ingredients; don’t over-moisten, as the dough should be stiff. If necessary, stir in enough more flour to stiffen it. Brush to spray the top with oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap. If desired, for best flavor or for convenience, you can refrigerate the dough for 3 to 10 hours. Then let rise at room temperature for 15 to 20 hours. If convenient, stir the dough once partway through the rise.
     
     2. Vigorously stir the dough, gradually sprinkling over and incorporating the cheese and chiles. Fold them in very thoroughly to ensure they are evenly distributed. If necessary, thoroughly stir in enough more flour to yield a very stiff dough. Using a well-oiled rubber spatula, fold the dough in towards the center, working all the way around the bowl. Invert the dough into a well-greased 9×5-inch loaf pan. Evenly brush or spray the dough top with oil. Using well-oiled kitchen shears or a serrated knife, make a ¼-inch-deep slash lengthwise down the center of the loaf. Cover the pan with nonstick spray-coated plastic wrap.
     
     3. For a 1½- to 2½-hour regular rise, let stand at warm temperature; for a 1- to 2-hour accelerated rise, let stand in a turned-off microwave along with 1 cup of boiling-hot water; or for an extended rise, refrigerate for 4 to 24 hours, then set out at room temperature. Continue the rise until the dough nears the plastic. Remove it and continue until the dough reaches ½ inch above the pan rim.
     
     4. 15 minutes before baking time, place a rack in the lower third of the oven; preheat to 425°F.
     
     5. Reduce the heat to 400°F. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes, until the top is nicely browned; cover the top with foil as needed. Continue baking for 20 to 30 minutes longer, or until a skewer inserted in the thickest part comes out with just a few particles clinging to the bottom (or until the center registers 204° to 206°F on an instant-read thermometer). Then bake for 5 minutes more to be sure the center is done. Cool in the pan on a wire rack for 10 minutes. Turn out the loaf onto the rack; cool thoroughly.
     
     6. Cool thoroughly before slicing or storing. Store air-tight in plastic or aluminum foil. The bread will keep at room temperature for 2 to 3 days, and may be frozen, airtight, for up to 2 months.
     
     (From Kneadlessly Simple by Nancy Baggett) YoNews    Quote     Like      Share                  beast   
    Posts 23,967
      Looney
    Looney        11 Jan 2010, 13:57 #210
     YoNews

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #21 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:44:56 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 22
  •           Radioman   
    Posts 2,583
      Top Cat
    Top Cat        12 Jan 2010, 14:39 #211
     Interesting STUFF here, if you're willing to wade through a lot of "chatter":
     
     http://www.doomers.us/forum2/index.php/board,5.0.html When all else fails: Amateur Radio    Quote     Like      Share                  beast   
    Posts 23,967
      Looney
    Looney        17 Jan 2010, 01:08 #212
     manage without the management :cow:
     
     ---
     
     Make a Plan
     
     After a major disaster, it is unlikely that emergency response services will be able to immediately respond to everyone’s needs, so it’s important to be prepared to take care of yourself and your family. Plan to be on your own for at least the first 72 hours.
     
     The following steps will help you prepare for any emergency:
     
     
     
     
     
     http://72hours.org/index.html
     
      YoNews    Quote     Like      Share                  beast   
    Posts 23,967
      Looney
    Looney        02 Feb 2010, 01:15 #213
     Said on the news today that there maybe a seed shortage this year due to the big increase of Europeans ordering from the U.S. as well.
     
     From the bigger hole the economy seems to keep falling into it might be wise to grow as much long storage veggies as possible.
     
     Field corn
     Potatoes
     Pinto beans
     
     All 3 of these are long term keepers and can keep you alive throughout the next year even if you don't have much of anything else to eat on. So long as you grow plenty of it. The corn can also be used for feed to keep those chickens alive.
     http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/showth ... p?t=340176 YoNews    Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        09 Feb 2010, 14:48 #214
     
    Radioman,Feb 9 2010 wrote: this was posted on one of my radio (scanner) forums.  Thought you might find the info useful:
     
    wrote:As far as "new" batteries are concerned, I've seen some really bad stuff being sold in recent years.  Batteries brand new out of the carton were effectively dead.  The number 1 culprit for me has been DuraCells.  I stopped buying that brand (including the re-branded Kirkland).
     
     I exclusively run NiMH batteries in all my scanners, when not on external power.  I purchased an expensive charger as well (not those cheap units they push at the big box retailers).  Because of the number of scanners I run, I was able to test a lot of different batteries all at once.  I can write a book here on what I've learned.
     
     Bottom line, the higher capacity batteries are not the best.  I've had better luck with 2000mah batteries (as compared to 2650 or 2700).  Sanyo Eneloops have worked the best for me.  Panasonic 2300 mah and Chicago Electric (Harbor Freight) 2000 mah come in 2nd.  Brands like DuraCell, Eveready, Energizer and PowerEx have all failed miserably.
     
     Lastly, the Maha C9000 battery charger, IMHO, was designed to sell more batteries.  Get the LaCrosse.
    "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        09 Feb 2010, 15:43 #215
     A great resource for survival gear. (Canadian)
     
     http://www.modernoutpost.com/
     
     
     :ks: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        26 Mar 2010, 16:46 #216
     I just finished cleaning up my storage room:
     
     
     
     
     
     
     You don't want to see my shed and garage..... :unsure:
     
     :ks: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        15 May 2010, 22:35 #217
     Because of late cold, and must do mechanic work, I was two weeks later this year (middle of May) than I was last year (end of April).
     
     I used leaves during the winter, and horse manure to prepare the garden. The end with where the leaves were packed, the clay soil broke up excellently, the end not so packed, still clumpy. LEAVES WORK!!!
     
     This year I planted 4 80 ft rows of sweet corn 2 ft apart, seed every 18" exactly, not where they were last year. This year I planted the stuff that did well last year, much more organized. I have a 80 ft row each of yellow beans, green beans, peas, and 1/2 row each of spinach and beets. The other 20x20 ft have 22 tomato plants on 2 ft centers, and 7 pepper plants.
     
     Larry had a 100x50 plowed and disced just below his garage, he planted corn and beans and peas and some cukes and watermelon. I planted 3 hills each of watermelon, cantaloupe, and cukes.
     
     Where ever I plant, I mix in those bags of 50/50 humous/cow manure that are real cheap at Walmart or Lowes (1.80). They worked well last year.
     
     All corn seed this year was last year's, frozen. We''ll let you know on that. "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                  oldmanmike   
    Posts 11,480
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        27 May 2010, 15:02 #218
     Everything's up except beets and spinach. They don't do well here.. Thank the Lord for what I do have. This picture was from a week ago. Everything has doubled in size.
      "History becomes legend,
     Legend fades into myth
     Myth is forgotten and denied
     Until history repeats itself"
         Quote     Like      Share                   oldmanmike nli         27 May 2010, 16:26 #219
     Making tomato puree - all the recipes are the same, I found these pictures with a hand cranked machine for pureeing tomatoes interesting. They also can the old way, boiling mason jars.
     
     They use 1/2 tsp salt per qt, and a gigantic (must be home-grown) basil leaf. Other websites call for 1/2 cup of vinegar/qt. Yuck. Forget that. I prefer a neutral taste to my sauce puree and paste additives.
     
     My pasta sauce recipe calls for 1 pt of puree. I look at this and wonder why I ever bought it.
     
     http://www.online-literature.com/forums/blog.php?b=6374
     
     The takeaway is, I don't feel bad about making a mess working with tomatoes. It's a messy job.    Quote      Share                  Morgan Byler   
    Posts 11,136
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        15 Oct 2010, 21:39 #220
     
     
     
     how did your garden grow this year, mike?
     
      storm's getting worse...
     we'll pass through it soon enough
     
     [size=50%]not by fire, but by ice? [/size]
     
     
      look at the sky five minutes every day and five minutes every night and it will change your life.? ?
     
     
     just sayin'

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #22 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:46:42 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 23
  •           Lazy   
    Posts 1,347
      Not quite right
    Not quite right        08 Nov 2010, 16:16 #221
     
     
     Link to a similar thread over a proxywhore...
     
     I'm not sure if this is redundant stuff or not...I've not even read CBAs thread.
     
     http://www.proxywhore.com/invboard/inde ... 16401&st=0
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     W.C. Fields: The laziest man I ever met put popcorn in his pancakes so they would turn over by themselves.
     
     Mortimer Caplan: Laziness is nothing more than the habit of resting before you get tired.
         Quote     Like      Share                  Herb   
    Posts 26,216
      Creepy as Hell
    Creepy as Hell        13 Nov 2010, 07:46 #222
     http://www.mredepot.com/servlet/the-639 ... ncy/Detail
     
     Pilot bread:
     
     http://www.mredepot.com/servlet/the-827 ... ead/Detail    Quote     Like      Share                  drummagick   
    Posts 10,377
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        12 Mar 2011, 12:24 #223
     From another forum (thanks, fb)
     
     
     
     Buy butter, cheese, and ice cream and freeze it. Get a few cases of Nido. Order a couple of #10 cans of dehydrated sour cream. >>>>
     
     
     
     <<<Fallout. Winds carry radioactive dust. If the containment building has exploded (and we do not know this yet) dust is going to float in the atmosphere from Japan, over Hawaii and the continental US, as well as parts of Canada. It is going to settle down on our land and water from sea to shining sea.
     
     After all the nuke tests in China, Russia, the Pacific, and the US western states, it's not like a little radiation dust is anything new. But since we DO know it is dangerous, it just makes sense not to suck the stuff into our bodies.
     
     What lands in the water will sink to the bottom. What lands on fruit and vegetables can be peeled or washed off. Meat is not a problem. The problem will be milk and milk products. Cows eat grass that is contaminated with radioactive dust and then excrete it in a concentrated form. We further concentrate the radiation by turning milk into cheese. Young women of childbearing years and children do not need a diet rich in radioactivity.
     
     IF there is a radioactive dust cloud it is going to take a few days to cross the Pacific and fall out over us. Depending on the winds, it could cover a good part of our dairylands within a week or so. At that point you want to stop buying fresh milk, cream, yogurt, etc from any area where cows are grazing in the open (you northerners who are still feeding cows hay are okay) and for the next year or so, avoid cheese, ice cream, etc. produced above the bottom 1/3 of the US. <a href="http://www.wunderground.com/US/WA/Wenat ... ck=infobox">
     <img src="http://banners.wunderground.com/weather ... atchee.gif" border=0
     a>    Quote     Like      Share                  Herb   
    Posts 26,216
      Creepy as Hell
    Creepy as Hell        16 Mar 2011, 20:39 #224
     Water barrel    Quote     Like      Share                   Guest         12 Jun 2011, 12:36 #225
     
    Radioman,Jun 12 2009 wrote: Anybody got any experience with deer repellent (no, can't use the 12 G!).
     
     Been here 8 years and this is the first year that the deer are all over the place!
     
     Someone told me to grate the soap, "Irish Spring" around the place, says deer can't stand it. Sounds like one of those rural legends (vs. Urban Legends!), but I'm going to try it this weekend. It's cheap enough, so that even if it doesn't work, I'm not out a lot and it can't do much harm, except maybe to make the lower 40 look like a bubble bath in a downpour
    :lol: I've heard peeing around the preimeter of your garden will work. As deer know humans to be predators they will seek to avoid contact.
     
     Will it work?
     
     :dunno:
     
     Never had a deer problem..yet. So I dunno.    Quote      Share                   Guest         22 Jun 2011, 19:25 #226
     
    Guest,Jun 12 2011 wrote:
    Radioman,Jun 12 2009 wrote: Anybody got any experience with deer repellent (no, can't use the 12 G!).
     
     Been here 8 years and this is the first year that the deer are all over the place!
     
     Someone told me to grate the soap, "Irish Spring" around the place, says deer can't stand it.  Sounds like one of those rural legends (vs. Urban Legends!), but I'm going to try it this weekend.  It's cheap enough, so that even if it doesn't work, I'm not out a lot and it can't do much harm, except maybe to make the lower 40 look like a bubble bath in a downpour   
    :lol: I've heard peeing around the preimeter of your garden will work. As deer know humans to be predators they will seek to avoid contact.
     
     Will it work?
     
     :dunno:
     
     Never had a deer problem..yet. So I dunno. I guess as long as no one sees you then no one can call the cops on you. Just be careful. Indecent exposure is not something you want on your file, these days.    Quote      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        10 Sep 2011, 23:03 #227
     Home canned bacon
     
     
     
     :ks: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        10 Sep 2011, 23:14 #228
     
     
     
     :ks: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  KnightStar   
    Posts 6,236
      CBA 12-step plan
    CBA 12-step plan        10 Sep 2011, 23:24 #229
     
     
     
     :ks: "The needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few, or the one."    Quote     Like      Share                  Sadie   
    Posts 62,392
      Creepy as Hell
    Creepy as Hell        15 Oct 2011, 21:10 #230
     
     This thread has lots of good information.
     
     Problem is, when TSHTF, how am I gonna look it all up??
     Cause I won't remember it then.
     
     
     
     LOTS of good info at this link.
     
     http://www.grandpappy.info/indexhar.htm
     
     

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Re: Emergency Preparedness Info - Chat Brat Anonymous
« Reply #23 on: Sep 03, 2018    06:48:52 PM »
 Emergency Preparedness Info       354 posts
  • 24
  •            Guest         16 Oct 2011, 21:21 #231
     [size=100%]I'm not prepped enough.[/size]
     
     My power went off at 1am the other night. It was still off at 7 am.
     
     I had no idea why....suddenly I only had 5 gal of water. Couldn't wash clothes.
     Had no access to news. The house seemed dead.
     
     I still had heat thanks to matches and a propane kitchen stove.
     
     Thats when it struck me...what if an EMP had struck.
     
     Food and toilet paper is great. But without electricity....I would be screwed.
     
     
     :unsure:
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     *I found out later that a car had hit a pole.    Quote      Share                   Guest         16 Oct 2011, 21:34 #232
     http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0016O ... PDKIKX0DER
     
     
     Sadie was asking about a radio.
     Heres a basic AM/FM that runs...
     
     Four AA batteries offer up to 80 hours of battery life for extended play.
     
     I believe I'll get one next time I order from Amazon.    Quote      Share                  Morgan Byler   
    Posts 11,136
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        16 Oct 2011, 21:50 #233
     
     
     agreed™, guest
     
     I need the pockylips to leave on the electricity, cable, and phone
     
     
     
     I am hoping to get that little battery operated tv that Charlie the Tuna posted about
     
     
      storm's getting worse...
     we'll pass through it soon enough
     
     [size=50%]not by fire, but by ice? [/size]
     
     
      look at the sky five minutes every day and five minutes every night and it will change your life.? ?
     
     
     just sayin'
     
         Quote     Like      Share                   Guest         16 Oct 2011, 22:28 #234
     
    Morgan Byler,Oct 16 2011 wrote: agreed™, guest
     
     I need the pockylips to leave on the electricity, cable, and phone
     
     
     
     I am hoping to get that little battery operated tv that Charlie the Tuna posted about
    Yeah I have one of those small color hand held tv's.
     
     But now with HDTV its worthless. :pissed:
     
     I need to get another one.
     
     When the power goes out..you start really wondering whats going on. :unsure:
     
     
     
     
     
    wrote:I need the pockylips to leave on the electricity, cable, and phone
    Agreed.    Quote      Share                   Guest         17 Oct 2011, 18:44 #235
     Don't forget....
     
     [size=100%]SOAP[/size]
     
     
     Deodorant
     liquid
     laundry
     
     I read somewhere where soap was the first/best line of defense against disease.    Quote      Share                  Morgan Byler   
    Posts 11,136
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        17 Oct 2011, 18:57 #236
     
     
     guest, after extensive searching by several people, Charlie the Tuna found the link to this battery operated tv
     
     the only other one, KS found and it's twice the price
     
     
     http://www.meritline.com/iview-3-5-368p ... 59337.aspx
     
      storm's getting worse...
     we'll pass through it soon enough
     
     [size=50%]not by fire, but by ice? [/size]
     
     
      look at the sky five minutes every day and five minutes every night and it will change your life.? ?
     
     
     just sayin'
     
         Quote     Like      Share                  Sadie   
    Posts 62,392
      Creepy as Hell
    Creepy as Hell        17 Oct 2011, 21:17 #237
     
    Guest,Oct 16 2011 wrote:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0016O ... PDKIKX0DER
     
     
     Sadie was asking about a radio.
     Heres a basic AM/FM that runs...
     
     Four AA batteries offer up to 80 hours of battery life for extended play.
     
     I believe I'll get one next time I order from Amazon. I've got a couple of basic am/fm radios.
     
     I was asking about shortwave or ham radios.
     
         Quote     Like      Share                   Guest         17 Oct 2011, 21:58 #238
     
    Morgan Byler,Oct 17 2011 wrote: guest, after extensive searching by several people, Charlie the Tuna found the link to this battery operated tv
     
     the only other one, KS found and it's twice the price
     
     
    http://www.meritline.com/iview-3-5-368p ... 59337.aspx Wow..thats just what I want. And not a bad price...and with free shipping.
     Thats definitely going on the to buy list.
     Thank you Morgan - Charlie..and all who searched.
     
     :hugs:    Quote      Share                  Morgan Byler   
    Posts 11,136
      Straight Jacket Time
    Straight Jacket Time        17 Oct 2011, 22:00 #239
     
     
     charlie found it
     
     i placed an order too
     
     i can get loads of AAs from Costco
     
     iwant to see the pockylips, even if it is on a 3" screen covered by local stations
     
      storm's getting worse...
     we'll pass through it soon enough
     
     [size=50%]not by fire, but by ice? [/size]
     
     
      look at the sky five minutes every day and five minutes every night and it will change your life.? ?
     
     
     just sayin'
     
         Quote     Like      Share                   Guest         17 Oct 2011, 22:01 #240
     
    Sadie,Oct 17 2011 wrote:
    Guest,Oct 16 2011 wrote:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0016O ... PDKIKX0DER
     
     
     Sadie was asking about a radio.
     Heres a basic AM/FM that runs...
     
     Four AA batteries offer up to 80 hours of battery life for extended play.
     
     I believe I'll get one next time I order from Amazon. I've got a couple of basic am/fm radios.
     
     I was asking about shortwave or ham radios. oh...sorry.
     
     I have a AM-FM radio with digitial tuning and it will kill 4 D batteries in 4 hours.
     :disbelief:
     
     So I was looking for something easy on batteries...and remembered you saying something about a radio.

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